Under harmony and cooperation: Patterns of conflict and competition in Hong Kong organizations

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/290037
Title:
Under harmony and cooperation: Patterns of conflict and competition in Hong Kong organizations
Author:
Koch, Pamela Lynn Tremain
Issue Date:
2004
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The prevailing wisdom in current intercultural research is that people in collectivistic societies such as Hong Kong have low levels of conflict and competition. This view is challenged, however, based on three arguments: cultural values are too often equated with actual practice, the multiple goals of actions are ignored, and the in-group/out-group distinction is not adequately addressed in theory and research. Data drawn from an ethnographic study of organizational relationships in Hong Kong indicate that a reexamination is in order. While the surface harmony reported in many studies was acknowledged, informants also consistently pointed to underlying currents of competition and conflict within the organization. Two models are proposed based on a reanalysis of the literature. The Classical Confucian Collectivist model represents the received view that Confucianism and collectivism lead to suppression of personal goals in favor of group goals. The Pragmatic Collectivist model, on the other hand, argues that instrumental goals still are the primary drivers of human interaction. While the Classical Confucian Collectivist might represent an idealized model that influences actors' accounts, the Pragmatic Collectivist model is a better representation of everyday action. Analysis of results in an experimental study lends support to these challenges.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Social.; Business Administration, Management.; Speech Communication.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Communication
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Jacobs, Scott

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleUnder harmony and cooperation: Patterns of conflict and competition in Hong Kong organizationsen_US
dc.creatorKoch, Pamela Lynn Tremainen_US
dc.contributor.authorKoch, Pamela Lynn Tremainen_US
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe prevailing wisdom in current intercultural research is that people in collectivistic societies such as Hong Kong have low levels of conflict and competition. This view is challenged, however, based on three arguments: cultural values are too often equated with actual practice, the multiple goals of actions are ignored, and the in-group/out-group distinction is not adequately addressed in theory and research. Data drawn from an ethnographic study of organizational relationships in Hong Kong indicate that a reexamination is in order. While the surface harmony reported in many studies was acknowledged, informants also consistently pointed to underlying currents of competition and conflict within the organization. Two models are proposed based on a reanalysis of the literature. The Classical Confucian Collectivist model represents the received view that Confucianism and collectivism lead to suppression of personal goals in favor of group goals. The Pragmatic Collectivist model, on the other hand, argues that instrumental goals still are the primary drivers of human interaction. While the Classical Confucian Collectivist might represent an idealized model that influences actors' accounts, the Pragmatic Collectivist model is a better representation of everyday action. Analysis of results in an experimental study lends support to these challenges.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Social.en_US
dc.subjectBusiness Administration, Management.en_US
dc.subjectSpeech Communication.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunicationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorJacobs, Scotten_US
dc.identifier.proquest3131609en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b46709095en_US
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