Professional identity, sense-making, and the market effect: Perspectives from new student affairs professionals

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/290031
Title:
Professional identity, sense-making, and the market effect: Perspectives from new student affairs professionals
Author:
Helm, Matthew P.
Issue Date:
2004
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
New student affairs professionals encounter a myriad of socialization challenges as they undergo both graduate and professional socialization and organizational socialization. More often than not, these environments are socializing new student affairs professionals in ways that are incongruent and perhaps even oppositional. Layered on top of these general socialization tensions is the emergence and encroachment of academic capitalism into student affairs professional environments. For the purpose of this dissertation, the term Market Effect with be utilized in place of academic capitalism to depict how academic capitalism has manifested itself in the student affairs profession. This case study of four college student personnel programs seeks to understand how new student affairs professionals make sense of and resolve socialization tensions in professional environments and the extent to which these socialization tensions are created by the marketization of the student affairs profession. The literatures drawn upon in this study include, the sociology of professions and professionalization, professional socialization and education, student affairs history and professional ideology, and academic capitalism and the marketization of student affairs. Implications and recommendations are made in the final chapter.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Higher.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Higher Education
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Rhoades, Gary

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleProfessional identity, sense-making, and the market effect: Perspectives from new student affairs professionalsen_US
dc.creatorHelm, Matthew P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHelm, Matthew P.en_US
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractNew student affairs professionals encounter a myriad of socialization challenges as they undergo both graduate and professional socialization and organizational socialization. More often than not, these environments are socializing new student affairs professionals in ways that are incongruent and perhaps even oppositional. Layered on top of these general socialization tensions is the emergence and encroachment of academic capitalism into student affairs professional environments. For the purpose of this dissertation, the term Market Effect with be utilized in place of academic capitalism to depict how academic capitalism has manifested itself in the student affairs profession. This case study of four college student personnel programs seeks to understand how new student affairs professionals make sense of and resolve socialization tensions in professional environments and the extent to which these socialization tensions are created by the marketization of the student affairs profession. The literatures drawn upon in this study include, the sociology of professions and professionalization, professional socialization and education, student affairs history and professional ideology, and academic capitalism and the marketization of student affairs. Implications and recommendations are made in the final chapter.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Higher.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHigher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRhoades, Garyen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3131603en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b46707323en_US
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