Optical coherence tomography and texture analysis: Non-invasive monitoring of tissue responses to glaucoma implants

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/290030
Title:
Optical coherence tomography and texture analysis: Non-invasive monitoring of tissue responses to glaucoma implants
Author:
Gossage, Kirk William
Issue Date:
2004
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Glaucoma is a set of diseases that cause optic nerve damage and visual field loss. The most important risk factor for the development of glaucoma is elevated intraocular pressure. One approach used to alleviate the pressure increase is to surgically install glaucoma implants. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an imaging modality capable of acquiring cross-sectional images of tissue using back-reflected light. The images have a resolution of 10-15μm, and are thus best suited for visualizing tissue layers and structures. OCT images of some tissue types have few or no features in this size range but display a characteristic repetitive structure due to speckle. The purpose of this research was to show that OCT is capable of visualizing tissue changes, such as those associated with a healing response to glaucoma implants. A new OCT handheld probe was developed to facilitate in vivo imaging in rabbit eye studies. The OCT probe consisted of a mechanical scaffold designed to allow the imaging fiber to be held in a fixed position with respect to the rabbit eye, with minimal anesthesia. A piezo-electric lateral scanning device allowed the imaging fiber to be scanned across the tissue so that 2-D images may be acquired. Preliminary analysis of OCT images of two types of glaucoma implants indicates that OCT can visualize the development of fibrous encapsulation of the implant, tissue erosion and tube position in the anterior chamber. The application of statistical and spectral texture analysis techniques was investigated for differentiating tissue types based on the structural and speckle content in OCT images. Excellent correct classification rates were obtained for images of tissues and tissue phantoms that had slight visual differences and reasonable rates were obtained with nearly identical-appearing images of tissues and tissue phantoms. This study shows that OCT is capable of visualizing structural changes, associated with the healing response, on the order of tens to hundreds of microns. OCT also shows promise in being able to detect sub-resolution tissue healing response changes, by quantifying the changes in the speckle seen in OCT images, using texture analysis.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Cell.; Engineering, Biomedical.; Biophysics, Medical.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Biomedical Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Barton, Jennifer K.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleOptical coherence tomography and texture analysis: Non-invasive monitoring of tissue responses to glaucoma implantsen_US
dc.creatorGossage, Kirk Williamen_US
dc.contributor.authorGossage, Kirk Williamen_US
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractGlaucoma is a set of diseases that cause optic nerve damage and visual field loss. The most important risk factor for the development of glaucoma is elevated intraocular pressure. One approach used to alleviate the pressure increase is to surgically install glaucoma implants. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an imaging modality capable of acquiring cross-sectional images of tissue using back-reflected light. The images have a resolution of 10-15μm, and are thus best suited for visualizing tissue layers and structures. OCT images of some tissue types have few or no features in this size range but display a characteristic repetitive structure due to speckle. The purpose of this research was to show that OCT is capable of visualizing tissue changes, such as those associated with a healing response to glaucoma implants. A new OCT handheld probe was developed to facilitate in vivo imaging in rabbit eye studies. The OCT probe consisted of a mechanical scaffold designed to allow the imaging fiber to be held in a fixed position with respect to the rabbit eye, with minimal anesthesia. A piezo-electric lateral scanning device allowed the imaging fiber to be scanned across the tissue so that 2-D images may be acquired. Preliminary analysis of OCT images of two types of glaucoma implants indicates that OCT can visualize the development of fibrous encapsulation of the implant, tissue erosion and tube position in the anterior chamber. The application of statistical and spectral texture analysis techniques was investigated for differentiating tissue types based on the structural and speckle content in OCT images. Excellent correct classification rates were obtained for images of tissues and tissue phantoms that had slight visual differences and reasonable rates were obtained with nearly identical-appearing images of tissues and tissue phantoms. This study shows that OCT is capable of visualizing structural changes, associated with the healing response, on the order of tens to hundreds of microns. OCT also shows promise in being able to detect sub-resolution tissue healing response changes, by quantifying the changes in the speckle seen in OCT images, using texture analysis.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Cell.en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Biomedical.en_US
dc.subjectBiophysics, Medical.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBiomedical Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBarton, Jennifer K.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3131600en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b46708893en_US
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