Growth, decay, and change: Organizations in the contemporary women's movement in Buenos Aires, Argentina

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/290021
Title:
Growth, decay, and change: Organizations in the contemporary women's movement in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Author:
Borland, Elizabeth Leslie
Issue Date:
2004
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Social movements have three potential trajectories: they can grow; they can change, and they can decay and eventually die. To compare their trajectories, I examine 47 organizations in six women's movements in Buenos Aires, Argentina during the last twenty years. I synthesize data from interviews with activists, organization documents and participant observation of women's movement activities during December 2001--June 2003, a period of intense collective action. Three themes--decision-making forms, participation, and external ties--are at the foundation of how we can understand social movement organization (SMO) growth, decay, and change. First, hierarchy does have its benefits for SMOs, but it is not the only means by which SMOs survive, remain active, and grow. Second, the way that SMOs actively structure participation (with decisions about SMO collective identity, exclusivity and inclusivity, non-member participation, and recruitment) is central to SMO growth. Third, outside ties with SMOs and other actors can bring groups material resources, external recognition, moral support, public attention, and human resources, but these relationships can be conflict-ridden. This dissertation generates a new way to think about SMOs as organizations that need to resolve dilemmas about decision-making, participation, and external ties. It contributes to the literature on social movements in Latin America and gendered collective action in the context of democratization. It also includes practical insights for social movement organizations and activists.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
History, Latin American.; Women's Studies.; Sociology, Social Structure and Development.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Sociology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Soule, Sarah A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleGrowth, decay, and change: Organizations in the contemporary women's movement in Buenos Aires, Argentinaen_US
dc.creatorBorland, Elizabeth Leslieen_US
dc.contributor.authorBorland, Elizabeth Leslieen_US
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractSocial movements have three potential trajectories: they can grow; they can change, and they can decay and eventually die. To compare their trajectories, I examine 47 organizations in six women's movements in Buenos Aires, Argentina during the last twenty years. I synthesize data from interviews with activists, organization documents and participant observation of women's movement activities during December 2001--June 2003, a period of intense collective action. Three themes--decision-making forms, participation, and external ties--are at the foundation of how we can understand social movement organization (SMO) growth, decay, and change. First, hierarchy does have its benefits for SMOs, but it is not the only means by which SMOs survive, remain active, and grow. Second, the way that SMOs actively structure participation (with decisions about SMO collective identity, exclusivity and inclusivity, non-member participation, and recruitment) is central to SMO growth. Third, outside ties with SMOs and other actors can bring groups material resources, external recognition, moral support, public attention, and human resources, but these relationships can be conflict-ridden. This dissertation generates a new way to think about SMOs as organizations that need to resolve dilemmas about decision-making, participation, and external ties. It contributes to the literature on social movements in Latin America and gendered collective action in the context of democratization. It also includes practical insights for social movement organizations and activists.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHistory, Latin American.en_US
dc.subjectWomen's Studies.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Social Structure and Development.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSociologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSoule, Sarah A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3131586en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b46709289en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.