The use of existing videoconferencing technology to deliver video remote interpreting services for deaf vocational rehabilitation clients

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289988
Title:
The use of existing videoconferencing technology to deliver video remote interpreting services for deaf vocational rehabilitation clients
Author:
Steinberg, Joyce Sidra
Issue Date:
2003
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This research examined the effectiveness of using existing videoconferencing technology, originally designed to deliver distance learning, to support Video Remote Interpreting (VRI). The purpose of the study was to demonstrate that the technology could facilitate a two-way counseling exchange between a non-signing Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) counselor and a deaf ASL client, in situations when there are no local interpreters available. The study involved 37 deaf clients who participated in VR interviews in which American Sign Language (ASL) interpreting, by CI/CT certified interpreters, was delivered either locally [control condition] or on video from a remote location [experimental condition]. Comprehension of VR programmatic material and satisfaction with the interview process were measured using a questionnaire developed by the researcher. The data were analyzed using group means, Standard Deviations, and t-tests of Independent Means. Results supported acceptance of the null hypotheses that there were no observed differences in either comprehension or satisfaction among the participant groups, regardless of whether interpreting was delivered in a traditional way or through VRI. Analysis further demonstrated the frame rate speed and bandwidth of the existing videoconferencing network could support real-time signing and fingerspelling. Best practice recommendations are included for consideration by other professionals planning to implement Video Remote Interpreting.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Technology of.; Education, Vocational.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Special Education, Rehabilitation and School Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
McCallan, Leslie C.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe use of existing videoconferencing technology to deliver video remote interpreting services for deaf vocational rehabilitation clientsen_US
dc.creatorSteinberg, Joyce Sidraen_US
dc.contributor.authorSteinberg, Joyce Sidraen_US
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis research examined the effectiveness of using existing videoconferencing technology, originally designed to deliver distance learning, to support Video Remote Interpreting (VRI). The purpose of the study was to demonstrate that the technology could facilitate a two-way counseling exchange between a non-signing Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) counselor and a deaf ASL client, in situations when there are no local interpreters available. The study involved 37 deaf clients who participated in VR interviews in which American Sign Language (ASL) interpreting, by CI/CT certified interpreters, was delivered either locally [control condition] or on video from a remote location [experimental condition]. Comprehension of VR programmatic material and satisfaction with the interview process were measured using a questionnaire developed by the researcher. The data were analyzed using group means, Standard Deviations, and t-tests of Independent Means. Results supported acceptance of the null hypotheses that there were no observed differences in either comprehension or satisfaction among the participant groups, regardless of whether interpreting was delivered in a traditional way or through VRI. Analysis further demonstrated the frame rate speed and bandwidth of the existing videoconferencing network could support real-time signing and fingerspelling. Best practice recommendations are included for consideration by other professionals planning to implement Video Remote Interpreting.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Technology of.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Vocational.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpecial Education, Rehabilitation and School Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMcCallan, Leslie C.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3108957en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b44830725en_US
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