Designing sustainability in the United States-Mexico borderlands: Policy design analysis of the Border Environment Cooperation Commission and prospects for sustainability

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289971
Title:
Designing sustainability in the United States-Mexico borderlands: Policy design analysis of the Border Environment Cooperation Commission and prospects for sustainability
Author:
Colnic, David Harold
Issue Date:
2003
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This research investigates environmental policy in the U.S.-Mexico borderlands. In particular, the analysis focuses on the Border Environment Cooperation Commission's (BECC) ability to facilitate sustainability in the region. Although BECC exerts some positive effects, in general, policy design flaws combined with administrative weaknesses limit the Commission's capacity to promote sustainability. The research divides into three main sections. The first section provides an overview of the U.S.-Mexico borderlands and justifies the method to analyze the region's public policy. The overview portrays boom-and-bust development pathologies that lead to social, political, economic, environmental hardships. This analysis also presents several regional characteristics--policy oriented social networks, binational institutions, and an ethic of place--that serve sustainability. The methodological overview focuses on policy design theory. According to design theory, effective public policy requires a close fit between the solution and problem contexts and the policy design. The second section evaluates the solution and problem contexts. These contextual analyses include a detailed discussion of sustainability, the problematic nature of public policy in borderlands, and specific characteristics of the U.S.-Mexico borderlands. Several criteria for U.S.-Mexico borderlands sustainability are developed based on these contextual analyses. The third section describes and evaluates BECC's performance. The specific focus is devoted BECC's institutional and policy designs and its major program areas. The research concludes with an overview of empirical and theoretical implications and a presentation of policy prescriptions to build BECC's capacity to facilitate sustainability.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Political Science, General.; Political Science, International Law and Relations.; Environmental Sciences.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Political Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Williams, Edward J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleDesigning sustainability in the United States-Mexico borderlands: Policy design analysis of the Border Environment Cooperation Commission and prospects for sustainabilityen_US
dc.creatorColnic, David Harolden_US
dc.contributor.authorColnic, David Harolden_US
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis research investigates environmental policy in the U.S.-Mexico borderlands. In particular, the analysis focuses on the Border Environment Cooperation Commission's (BECC) ability to facilitate sustainability in the region. Although BECC exerts some positive effects, in general, policy design flaws combined with administrative weaknesses limit the Commission's capacity to promote sustainability. The research divides into three main sections. The first section provides an overview of the U.S.-Mexico borderlands and justifies the method to analyze the region's public policy. The overview portrays boom-and-bust development pathologies that lead to social, political, economic, environmental hardships. This analysis also presents several regional characteristics--policy oriented social networks, binational institutions, and an ethic of place--that serve sustainability. The methodological overview focuses on policy design theory. According to design theory, effective public policy requires a close fit between the solution and problem contexts and the policy design. The second section evaluates the solution and problem contexts. These contextual analyses include a detailed discussion of sustainability, the problematic nature of public policy in borderlands, and specific characteristics of the U.S.-Mexico borderlands. Several criteria for U.S.-Mexico borderlands sustainability are developed based on these contextual analyses. The third section describes and evaluates BECC's performance. The specific focus is devoted BECC's institutional and policy designs and its major program areas. The research concludes with an overview of empirical and theoretical implications and a presentation of policy prescriptions to build BECC's capacity to facilitate sustainability.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPolitical Science, General.en_US
dc.subjectPolitical Science, International Law and Relations.en_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental Sciences.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWilliams, Edward J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3108894en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b44825079en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.