Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289959
Title:
The nature of phenomenal content
Author:
Thompson, Bradley Jon
Issue Date:
2003
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
There is something it is like to see a bright red cardinal, to touch a stucco wall, or to hear an ambulance pass by. Each of these experiences has a distinctive phenomenal character. But in virtue of what it is like to have a particular experience--in virtue of the experience's phenomenal character--the world is presented to the subject as being a certain way. The dissertation is concerned with the nature of this "phenomenal content". In Chapter One I argue that there is such a thing as phenomenal content, understood as intentional content that supervenes necessarily on phenomenal character. The rest of the dissertation is concerned with the nature of this phenomenal content, and in particular the phenomenal content of visual experiences. In Chapter Two I present and critique the dominant view about phenomenal color content, what I call "standard Russellianism". According to standard Russellianism, the content of color experience consists solely in the representation of specific mind-independent physical color properties. I present an argument against such views based on the possibility of spectrum inversion without illusion. Further, I argue that such views fail to properly accommodate the phenomenon of color constancy. In Chapter Three, I address a different form of Russellian theory of phenomenal content advocated by Sydney Shoemaker. I present my own positive view of phenomenal color content in Chapter Four. There I argue that color content is a kind of Fregean content, involving modes of presentation of colors. In particular, I argue that phenomenal color content involves indexical, response-dependent, and holistic modes of presentation. Finally, in Chapter Five I turn to the spatial aspects of visual experience. I argue against Russellianism for spatial phenomenal content, based on the consideration of a kind of spatial Twin Earth thought experiment. In its place, I argue that spatial phenomenal content is also a kind of Fregean content.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Philosophy.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Philosophy
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Chalmers, David J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe nature of phenomenal contenten_US
dc.creatorThompson, Bradley Jonen_US
dc.contributor.authorThompson, Bradley Jonen_US
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThere is something it is like to see a bright red cardinal, to touch a stucco wall, or to hear an ambulance pass by. Each of these experiences has a distinctive phenomenal character. But in virtue of what it is like to have a particular experience--in virtue of the experience's phenomenal character--the world is presented to the subject as being a certain way. The dissertation is concerned with the nature of this "phenomenal content". In Chapter One I argue that there is such a thing as phenomenal content, understood as intentional content that supervenes necessarily on phenomenal character. The rest of the dissertation is concerned with the nature of this phenomenal content, and in particular the phenomenal content of visual experiences. In Chapter Two I present and critique the dominant view about phenomenal color content, what I call "standard Russellianism". According to standard Russellianism, the content of color experience consists solely in the representation of specific mind-independent physical color properties. I present an argument against such views based on the possibility of spectrum inversion without illusion. Further, I argue that such views fail to properly accommodate the phenomenon of color constancy. In Chapter Three, I address a different form of Russellian theory of phenomenal content advocated by Sydney Shoemaker. I present my own positive view of phenomenal color content in Chapter Four. There I argue that color content is a kind of Fregean content, involving modes of presentation of colors. In particular, I argue that phenomenal color content involves indexical, response-dependent, and holistic modes of presentation. Finally, in Chapter Five I turn to the spatial aspects of visual experience. I argue against Russellianism for spatial phenomenal content, based on the consideration of a kind of spatial Twin Earth thought experiment. In its place, I argue that spatial phenomenal content is also a kind of Fregean content.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPhilosophy.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePhilosophyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorChalmers, David J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3107047en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b44666998en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.