Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289958
Title:
The behavioral ecology of Folsom lithic technology
Author:
Surovell, Todd
Issue Date:
2003
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation is a study in the use of formal optimality models to explore intersite variability in lithic assemblages within a behavioral ecological framework. Formal models of raw material procurement, core, biface, and tool design, and flake and tool discard are developed and tested using data from late Pleistocene Folsom and Goshen archaeological sites in Wyoming and Colorado: Locality B of Barger Gulch, Upper Twin Mountain, Krmpotich, the Area 2 Folsom component of Agate Basin, and the Folsom component of Carter/Kerr-McGee. Because residential mobility is a primary constraint shaping the technology of mobile peoples, I also develop various assemblage-scale measures of occupation span and site reoccupation to allow investigation of the effects of mobility on lithic technology. It is argued that the goals of the behavioral ecological approach are identical to those of "technological organization"--to determine the general principles governing the use and discard of stone tools within an optimality framework. However, the use of formal models in behavioral ecology, as opposed to informal narrative models in studies of technological organization, results in a logically and theoretically more robust method in the former, due to explicit definition of constraints, currencies, and goals. Unlike many models of technological organization, the models developed herein are based upon very simple component variables that are relatively straightforward to monitor with archaeological data. Furthermore, when using formal mathematical models, predictions must logically follow from the theoretical construct, something not necessarily true of informal models. I highlight the utility of this approach by drawing several conclusions about Folsom and Goshen mobility and technology in the study area. Although Paleoindian adaptations are often portrayed as somewhat redundant, I emphasize that considerable variability exists within the Paleoindian mobility and technological regimes.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Anthropology, Archaeology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Kuhn, Steven L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe behavioral ecology of Folsom lithic technologyen_US
dc.creatorSurovell, Todden_US
dc.contributor.authorSurovell, Todden_US
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation is a study in the use of formal optimality models to explore intersite variability in lithic assemblages within a behavioral ecological framework. Formal models of raw material procurement, core, biface, and tool design, and flake and tool discard are developed and tested using data from late Pleistocene Folsom and Goshen archaeological sites in Wyoming and Colorado: Locality B of Barger Gulch, Upper Twin Mountain, Krmpotich, the Area 2 Folsom component of Agate Basin, and the Folsom component of Carter/Kerr-McGee. Because residential mobility is a primary constraint shaping the technology of mobile peoples, I also develop various assemblage-scale measures of occupation span and site reoccupation to allow investigation of the effects of mobility on lithic technology. It is argued that the goals of the behavioral ecological approach are identical to those of "technological organization"--to determine the general principles governing the use and discard of stone tools within an optimality framework. However, the use of formal models in behavioral ecology, as opposed to informal narrative models in studies of technological organization, results in a logically and theoretically more robust method in the former, due to explicit definition of constraints, currencies, and goals. Unlike many models of technological organization, the models developed herein are based upon very simple component variables that are relatively straightforward to monitor with archaeological data. Furthermore, when using formal mathematical models, predictions must logically follow from the theoretical construct, something not necessarily true of informal models. I highlight the utility of this approach by drawing several conclusions about Folsom and Goshen mobility and technology in the study area. Although Paleoindian adaptations are often portrayed as somewhat redundant, I emphasize that considerable variability exists within the Paleoindian mobility and technological regimes.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Archaeology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKuhn, Steven L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3107044en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b44666962en_US
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