Exploration of student disclosure of learning disabilities to university professors

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289953
Title:
Exploration of student disclosure of learning disabilities to university professors
Author:
Sandock, Beverly
Issue Date:
2002
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to explore and describe the disclosure process for university students with learning disabilities. The study used qualitative and quantitative research methods to gather data and to measure the psychosocial development. A telephone survey, personal interviews, and The Student Developmental Task and Lifestyle Inventory (SDTLI) were used. The participants included 148 university students with learning disabilities who were enrolled in a learning disabilities fee-based support program at a Research I University. The study found that the psychosocial development of students with learning disabilities did not differ significantly from the norming sample on the SDTLI, nor were there any significant differences between cohort status or gender of students with learning disabilities. The majority of students disclosed their learning disabilities to their instructors in order to use accommodations. Students with learning disabilities considered classroom climate, instructor characteristics, and peers in their decision making about disclosure. The results have implications for faculty, staff, and administrators because successful students seem to reframe their learning disability challenges into positive outcomes. Even students who tended to doubt their successes used reframing. Personnel and faculty members who have contact with students with learning disabilities need to understand that the students are capable and have typical psychosocial development.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Guidance and Counseling.; Education, Special.; Education, Higher.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Higher Education
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Woodard, Dudley

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleExploration of student disclosure of learning disabilities to university professorsen_US
dc.creatorSandock, Beverlyen_US
dc.contributor.authorSandock, Beverlyen_US
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to explore and describe the disclosure process for university students with learning disabilities. The study used qualitative and quantitative research methods to gather data and to measure the psychosocial development. A telephone survey, personal interviews, and The Student Developmental Task and Lifestyle Inventory (SDTLI) were used. The participants included 148 university students with learning disabilities who were enrolled in a learning disabilities fee-based support program at a Research I University. The study found that the psychosocial development of students with learning disabilities did not differ significantly from the norming sample on the SDTLI, nor were there any significant differences between cohort status or gender of students with learning disabilities. The majority of students disclosed their learning disabilities to their instructors in order to use accommodations. Students with learning disabilities considered classroom climate, instructor characteristics, and peers in their decision making about disclosure. The results have implications for faculty, staff, and administrators because successful students seem to reframe their learning disability challenges into positive outcomes. Even students who tended to doubt their successes used reframing. Personnel and faculty members who have contact with students with learning disabilities need to understand that the students are capable and have typical psychosocial development.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Guidance and Counseling.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Special.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Higher.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHigher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWoodard, Dudleyen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3107039en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b44666901en_US
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