A comparative study of soil disturbance from uprooted trees, and mound and pit decay in Puerto Rico and Colorado

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289948
Title:
A comparative study of soil disturbance from uprooted trees, and mound and pit decay in Puerto Rico and Colorado
Author:
Lenart, Melanie
Issue Date:
2003
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The toppling of trees forms mounds of disturbed sediment and pits from which the mound removes sediment, rocks, and organic matter. Sites of uprooted trees in Puerto Rico and Colorado were examined (1) to compare areas and volumes of mounds and pits relative to tree size, (2) to compare areas and volumes of mounds and pits formed during catastrophic events at the landscape scale, and (3) to consider decay of mounds and pits after formation. For a given basal area, the analyses found no difference among sites in area and volume of freshly formed individual mounds and pits. For landscape-level catastrophic uprooting, the percent of toppled trees in a plot can explain 85% and 87% of the areas and volumes, respectively, of the quantity of soil uplifted. Exponential decay coefficients developed by monitoring mound/pit complexes indicate that mounds and pits at the humid tropical site in Puerto Rico decay in about 74% and 57% of the time, respectively, of mounds and pits at a temperate Colorado site. Decay coefficients developed for the Colorado site indicate that mounds and pits are reduced to 10% of their original volume within 30 and 78 years, respectively. Coefficients for Puerto Rico suggest that a similar reduction in volume requires 17 years, whereas pits generally fill within a decade.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Geology.; Agriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.; Agriculture, Soil Science.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Renewable Natural Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Osterkamp, Waite R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleA comparative study of soil disturbance from uprooted trees, and mound and pit decay in Puerto Rico and Coloradoen_US
dc.creatorLenart, Melanieen_US
dc.contributor.authorLenart, Melanieen_US
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe toppling of trees forms mounds of disturbed sediment and pits from which the mound removes sediment, rocks, and organic matter. Sites of uprooted trees in Puerto Rico and Colorado were examined (1) to compare areas and volumes of mounds and pits relative to tree size, (2) to compare areas and volumes of mounds and pits formed during catastrophic events at the landscape scale, and (3) to consider decay of mounds and pits after formation. For a given basal area, the analyses found no difference among sites in area and volume of freshly formed individual mounds and pits. For landscape-level catastrophic uprooting, the percent of toppled trees in a plot can explain 85% and 87% of the areas and volumes, respectively, of the quantity of soil uplifted. Exponential decay coefficients developed by monitoring mound/pit complexes indicate that mounds and pits at the humid tropical site in Puerto Rico decay in about 74% and 57% of the time, respectively, of mounds and pits at a temperate Colorado site. Decay coefficients developed for the Colorado site indicate that mounds and pits are reduced to 10% of their original volume within 30 and 78 years, respectively. Coefficients for Puerto Rico suggest that a similar reduction in volume requires 17 years, whereas pits generally fill within a decade.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectGeology.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Soil Science.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorOsterkamp, Waite R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3107012en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b44663249en_US
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