Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289944
Title:
Reading music and written text: The process of sight-singing
Author:
Knox, Marjorie
Issue Date:
2003
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this dissertation is to examine the cues and miscues singers produce while reading musical text with written text. Analysis of the miscues focuses on defining the process and strategies singers use as they sight-sing a piece of music never before seen or heard. The research of Kenneth S. Goodman forms the basis for the procedures and methodology used in data collection and data analysis. Sight-singing data collected from eight singers, including all cues, miscues, asides, and specific notes, was transcribed on a musicscript. This data yielded 923 musical text and written text cues and miscues. Analysis provides the data that evolved into the Sight-Singing Musical Miscue Taxonomy, a tool for evaluating the miscues of singers orally reading music. A Musical Miscue Inventory Coding Form also was developed using the categories and sub-categories of the Sight-Singing Musical Miscue Taxonomy. The results of the eight singers' use of cues and miscues of the Sight-Singing Musical Miscue Taxonomy and the Musical Miscue Inventory Coding Form provides evidence for the parallel but distinct nature of sight-singing as two semiotic systems working in conjunction with each other-musical text and written text. The results also provide the means to establish a relationship between the sociopsycholinguistic transactive model of reading and the sociopsychomusical linguistic transactive model of sight singing. The findings of this research show that sight-singers utilize the same holistic process and strategies as readers do. The cueing systems, the cognitive strategies, and the learning cycles are the same.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Language and Literature.; Education, Music.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Language, Reading and Culture
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Goodman, Yetta M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleReading music and written text: The process of sight-singingen_US
dc.creatorKnox, Marjorieen_US
dc.contributor.authorKnox, Marjorieen_US
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this dissertation is to examine the cues and miscues singers produce while reading musical text with written text. Analysis of the miscues focuses on defining the process and strategies singers use as they sight-sing a piece of music never before seen or heard. The research of Kenneth S. Goodman forms the basis for the procedures and methodology used in data collection and data analysis. Sight-singing data collected from eight singers, including all cues, miscues, asides, and specific notes, was transcribed on a musicscript. This data yielded 923 musical text and written text cues and miscues. Analysis provides the data that evolved into the Sight-Singing Musical Miscue Taxonomy, a tool for evaluating the miscues of singers orally reading music. A Musical Miscue Inventory Coding Form also was developed using the categories and sub-categories of the Sight-Singing Musical Miscue Taxonomy. The results of the eight singers' use of cues and miscues of the Sight-Singing Musical Miscue Taxonomy and the Musical Miscue Inventory Coding Form provides evidence for the parallel but distinct nature of sight-singing as two semiotic systems working in conjunction with each other-musical text and written text. The results also provide the means to establish a relationship between the sociopsycholinguistic transactive model of reading and the sociopsychomusical linguistic transactive model of sight singing. The findings of this research show that sight-singers utilize the same holistic process and strategies as readers do. The cueing systems, the cognitive strategies, and the learning cycles are the same.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Language and Literature.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Music.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLanguage, Reading and Cultureen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGoodman, Yetta M.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3107009en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b44663146en_US
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