The legalization of conventional international governmental organizations: An empirical survey

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289925
Title:
The legalization of conventional international governmental organizations: An empirical survey
Author:
Cockerham, Geoffrey B.
Issue Date:
2003
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
International legalization refers to the idea that states voluntarily accept legal constraints in certain issue areas. Although the phenomenon of international legalization has become increasingly prominent in world affairs, its growth has been uneven. The purpose of this project is to perform a systematic examination of international legalization by providing an empirical survey of conventional international governmental organizations (IGOs). Due to the lack of a supranational sovereign government, most activity in the international system is not very legalized. IGOs are the most legalized international institutions. They are created by international agreements of states and they include substantive rules that states must follow as well as procedural rules that allow institutions of the organization to conduct its functions. These IGOs exhibit a wide variation in legalization. This observation raises a question as to what can account for this variation? The first step in approaching this task is to build upon the concept of legalization and develop a measure of legalization that is applicable to IGOs. An analysis of the constitutional mandates of these organizations reveals certain characteristics in their respective texts that can be used to create an index of legalization that will allow for a comparison of legal structures across organizations. The next step is to evaluate hypotheses deriving from functionalism, collective action, realism, and neoliberal institutionalism to explain the variation in these observations. These hypotheses are based upon potential explanations at the organizational and at the state level. Using evidence from descriptive data and appropriate methodologies, the findings of the project reveals that the number of members in an organization is an influential characteristic in regard to the level of IGO legalization. It also indicates that the wealth of a member state is also a positively related factor to whether a state will be a party to a highly legalized IGO agreement.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Political Science, General.; Political Science, International Law and Relations.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Political Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Dixon, William J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe legalization of conventional international governmental organizations: An empirical surveyen_US
dc.creatorCockerham, Geoffrey B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCockerham, Geoffrey B.en_US
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractInternational legalization refers to the idea that states voluntarily accept legal constraints in certain issue areas. Although the phenomenon of international legalization has become increasingly prominent in world affairs, its growth has been uneven. The purpose of this project is to perform a systematic examination of international legalization by providing an empirical survey of conventional international governmental organizations (IGOs). Due to the lack of a supranational sovereign government, most activity in the international system is not very legalized. IGOs are the most legalized international institutions. They are created by international agreements of states and they include substantive rules that states must follow as well as procedural rules that allow institutions of the organization to conduct its functions. These IGOs exhibit a wide variation in legalization. This observation raises a question as to what can account for this variation? The first step in approaching this task is to build upon the concept of legalization and develop a measure of legalization that is applicable to IGOs. An analysis of the constitutional mandates of these organizations reveals certain characteristics in their respective texts that can be used to create an index of legalization that will allow for a comparison of legal structures across organizations. The next step is to evaluate hypotheses deriving from functionalism, collective action, realism, and neoliberal institutionalism to explain the variation in these observations. These hypotheses are based upon potential explanations at the organizational and at the state level. Using evidence from descriptive data and appropriate methodologies, the findings of the project reveals that the number of members in an organization is an influential characteristic in regard to the level of IGO legalization. It also indicates that the wealth of a member state is also a positively related factor to whether a state will be a party to a highly legalized IGO agreement.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPolitical Science, General.en_US
dc.subjectPolitical Science, International Law and Relations.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDixon, William J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3106976en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b44649228en_US
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