Voces de Las Madres: Traumatic bereavement after gang-related homicide

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289924
Title:
Voces de Las Madres: Traumatic bereavement after gang-related homicide
Author:
Campesino-Flenniken, Maureen
Issue Date:
2003
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This narrative ethnography analyzed cultural processes influencing bereavement following Latino gang-related homicide in the Southwestern U.S. A hermeneutic approach explicated bereavement experiences of two mothers, one Mexican American and one Pascau Yaqui/Mexican, whose sons were killed in the same gang-related event. Responses to gang-related deaths from Latino communities were also studied. The mothers' bereavement included six processes: (1) dehumanization; (2) ongoing shock; (3) diversity in bereavement responses; (4) spiritual and religious aspects; (5) construction of meaning; and (6) emerging self-transcendence. Mothers' bereavement responses were highly reflective of their own cultural contexts. The process of dehumanization was an important reflection of the social stigma the mothers felt about gang-related deaths. The process of self-transcendence indicated the mothers utilized personal and cultural resources to develop new perspectives that enhanced their lives in the context of great suffering. Two themes emerged among Mexican American communities one-week following gang-related deaths. First, rituals embodied four communal functions: (1) providing community support; (2) honor and recognition for the deceased; (3) helping the deceased; and (4) support in expression of emotions. Second, public discourse functioned to rehumanize the deceased and their communities and reinforced reciprocal relationships between the living and dead. Among Mexican American parents struggling to integrate the violent death of a child, four themes were identified: (1) sharing the process of bereavement; (2) sensing spiritual connections with the child; (3) creating space and place for the child; and (4) contesting dehumanizing public domains. Findings from this study have implications for practice, research, and theory in nursing and other human science disciplines. Parents grieving stigmatized deaths may suffer greatly due to dehumanizing judicial proceedings and media representations that complicate the bereavement process. The use of narratives, or storytelling, was an important strategy in rehumanization and an effective vehicle for the establishment of a therapeutic relationship. Conceptually and methodologically, studies on traumatic bereavement may need to account for and measure the simultaneous presence of distress and wellness during people's healing trajectories. Bereavement theorists may need to re-evaluate notions of maladaptive grieving to account for disorganized states of being that may accompany people's evolution in healing trajectories.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Anthropology, Cultural.; Health Sciences, Nursing.; Psychology, Personality.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Glittenberg, JoAnn E.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleVoces de Las Madres: Traumatic bereavement after gang-related homicideen_US
dc.creatorCampesino-Flenniken, Maureenen_US
dc.contributor.authorCampesino-Flenniken, Maureenen_US
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis narrative ethnography analyzed cultural processes influencing bereavement following Latino gang-related homicide in the Southwestern U.S. A hermeneutic approach explicated bereavement experiences of two mothers, one Mexican American and one Pascau Yaqui/Mexican, whose sons were killed in the same gang-related event. Responses to gang-related deaths from Latino communities were also studied. The mothers' bereavement included six processes: (1) dehumanization; (2) ongoing shock; (3) diversity in bereavement responses; (4) spiritual and religious aspects; (5) construction of meaning; and (6) emerging self-transcendence. Mothers' bereavement responses were highly reflective of their own cultural contexts. The process of dehumanization was an important reflection of the social stigma the mothers felt about gang-related deaths. The process of self-transcendence indicated the mothers utilized personal and cultural resources to develop new perspectives that enhanced their lives in the context of great suffering. Two themes emerged among Mexican American communities one-week following gang-related deaths. First, rituals embodied four communal functions: (1) providing community support; (2) honor and recognition for the deceased; (3) helping the deceased; and (4) support in expression of emotions. Second, public discourse functioned to rehumanize the deceased and their communities and reinforced reciprocal relationships between the living and dead. Among Mexican American parents struggling to integrate the violent death of a child, four themes were identified: (1) sharing the process of bereavement; (2) sensing spiritual connections with the child; (3) creating space and place for the child; and (4) contesting dehumanizing public domains. Findings from this study have implications for practice, research, and theory in nursing and other human science disciplines. Parents grieving stigmatized deaths may suffer greatly due to dehumanizing judicial proceedings and media representations that complicate the bereavement process. The use of narratives, or storytelling, was an important strategy in rehumanization and an effective vehicle for the establishment of a therapeutic relationship. Conceptually and methodologically, studies on traumatic bereavement may need to account for and measure the simultaneous presence of distress and wellness during people's healing trajectories. Bereavement theorists may need to re-evaluate notions of maladaptive grieving to account for disorganized states of being that may accompany people's evolution in healing trajectories.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Cultural.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Nursing.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Personality.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGlittenberg, JoAnn E.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3106975en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b44649204en_US
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