Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289923
Title:
The impact of residential segregation on consumer disadvantage
Author:
Crockett, David Kevin
Issue Date:
2001
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this dissertation is twofold. First, it is to enhance conceptual clarity in the consumer behavior literature on consumer disadvantage by investigating the role of racial inequality in consumer experiences in markets for basic needs products. That is, this research analyzes how consumer disadvantage is experienced in markets for food and health care in order to illustrate the operation of racial inequality situated in a context where class and gender inequality also operate simultaneously. A second purpose of this project is to construct and assess a grounded typology of consumer responses to disadvantage in such settings. The emergent findings in this study are that racial inequality primarily structures the operation of disadvantage in markets for food, and class-based inequality primarily structures the operation of disadvantage in markets for health care. However, while a single inequality form may structure the operation of disadvantage in each market multiple forms of inequality are present. An additional emergent finding is that consumers employ resistance and coping strategies to address their disadvantaged status consistent with human ecology theory. These individual acts of human agency also interact with impediments produced by social structure to create an array of responses to disadvantage that have varying degrees of effectiveness and functionality.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Business Administration, Marketing.; Sociology, General.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Industrial Management
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Wallendorf, Melanie

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe impact of residential segregation on consumer disadvantageen_US
dc.creatorCrockett, David Kevinen_US
dc.contributor.authorCrockett, David Kevinen_US
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this dissertation is twofold. First, it is to enhance conceptual clarity in the consumer behavior literature on consumer disadvantage by investigating the role of racial inequality in consumer experiences in markets for basic needs products. That is, this research analyzes how consumer disadvantage is experienced in markets for food and health care in order to illustrate the operation of racial inequality situated in a context where class and gender inequality also operate simultaneously. A second purpose of this project is to construct and assess a grounded typology of consumer responses to disadvantage in such settings. The emergent findings in this study are that racial inequality primarily structures the operation of disadvantage in markets for food, and class-based inequality primarily structures the operation of disadvantage in markets for health care. However, while a single inequality form may structure the operation of disadvantage in each market multiple forms of inequality are present. An additional emergent finding is that consumers employ resistance and coping strategies to address their disadvantaged status consistent with human ecology theory. These individual acts of human agency also interact with impediments produced by social structure to create an array of responses to disadvantage that have varying degrees of effectiveness and functionality.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBusiness Administration, Marketing.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, General.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineIndustrial Managementen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWallendorf, Melanieen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3010242en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b41711129en_US
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