Cognitive mapping and spatial navigation in patients with anterior temporal lobectomy

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289912
Title:
Cognitive mapping and spatial navigation in patients with anterior temporal lobectomy
Author:
Thomas, Kevin Garth
Issue Date:
2003
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this paper is to examine questions about the role of the hippocampal formation in spatial cognition and spatial navigation. Specifically, Study 1 and Study 2 show that patients with unilateral language nondominant anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) show impairments on tasks assessing cognitive mapping. Study 3 shows that the ability of these patients to navigate a virtual environment (VE) by means of cognitive maps is disrupted. Study 4 shows that, under normal circumstances, healthy adults have a choice of at least two spatial navigation strategies (navigation by means of heading vectors, or navigation by means of cognitive mapping), and that they will likely choose the optimal strategy for task solution. Study 5 suggests that patients with unilateral language nondominant ATL are able to successfully navigate by means of heading vectors. The data from these studies are generally consistent with predictions derived from cognitive mapping theory (O'Keefe & Nadel, 1978). The data are also consistent with other empirical and theoretical work in pointing to the hippocampal formation of the language nondominant hemisphere as the neural substrate of a cognitive mapping system.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Clinical.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Jacobs, W. Jake

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleCognitive mapping and spatial navigation in patients with anterior temporal lobectomyen_US
dc.creatorThomas, Kevin Garthen_US
dc.contributor.authorThomas, Kevin Garthen_US
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this paper is to examine questions about the role of the hippocampal formation in spatial cognition and spatial navigation. Specifically, Study 1 and Study 2 show that patients with unilateral language nondominant anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) show impairments on tasks assessing cognitive mapping. Study 3 shows that the ability of these patients to navigate a virtual environment (VE) by means of cognitive maps is disrupted. Study 4 shows that, under normal circumstances, healthy adults have a choice of at least two spatial navigation strategies (navigation by means of heading vectors, or navigation by means of cognitive mapping), and that they will likely choose the optimal strategy for task solution. Study 5 suggests that patients with unilateral language nondominant ATL are able to successfully navigate by means of heading vectors. The data from these studies are generally consistent with predictions derived from cognitive mapping theory (O'Keefe & Nadel, 1978). The data are also consistent with other empirical and theoretical work in pointing to the hippocampal formation of the language nondominant hemisphere as the neural substrate of a cognitive mapping system.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Clinical.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorJacobs, W. Jakeen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3090026en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b44426914en_US
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