Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289911
Title:
A just rhetoric
Author:
Clayton, Kathleen
Issue Date:
2001
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation examines the pedagogical practices and written texts of The New York Association for Working Girls between 1890 and 1894 in order to identify elements that are useful in constructing a just rhetoric for teaching business communication today. The late 1890s were a period of economic pressure In the face of cultural, physical, and industrial expansion for the United States much like the late 1990s--early 2000s mark a time of economic pressure in the context of cultural, physical, and technological expansion for the university. The older New York women aimed to uplift the souls of the newly arrived immigrant working girls by defining and identifying for them appropriate ways of speaking, writing, dressing, and living. They were concerned with the exterior identity and conscious identifications among all females. However, an identification of the pedagogical unconscious, that is those sites of conflict, ambiguity, or contradiction in the works of the New York Association for Working Girls serves as a foundation for using the past to examine current definitions and identities in teaching business communications. Most research on business communications within a technological age identifies theoretical links between composition and computers, business communications and rhetoric, but few if any identify practical pedagogy within the context of links between electronic business, rhetoric, and composition within an integrated curriculum of a business college. In using the tools to uncover the unexamined differences within the New York Association for Working Girls, I define the pedagogical unconscious of a team-taught MBA course that integrates business communications. I use the elements I identify to construct a new pedagogy that I believe is just and inclusive to all when used to teach business communications in a technological age.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Language, Rhetoric and Composition.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; English
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Enos, Theresa

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleA just rhetoricen_US
dc.creatorClayton, Kathleenen_US
dc.contributor.authorClayton, Kathleenen_US
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation examines the pedagogical practices and written texts of The New York Association for Working Girls between 1890 and 1894 in order to identify elements that are useful in constructing a just rhetoric for teaching business communication today. The late 1890s were a period of economic pressure In the face of cultural, physical, and industrial expansion for the United States much like the late 1990s--early 2000s mark a time of economic pressure in the context of cultural, physical, and technological expansion for the university. The older New York women aimed to uplift the souls of the newly arrived immigrant working girls by defining and identifying for them appropriate ways of speaking, writing, dressing, and living. They were concerned with the exterior identity and conscious identifications among all females. However, an identification of the pedagogical unconscious, that is those sites of conflict, ambiguity, or contradiction in the works of the New York Association for Working Girls serves as a foundation for using the past to examine current definitions and identities in teaching business communications. Most research on business communications within a technological age identifies theoretical links between composition and computers, business communications and rhetoric, but few if any identify practical pedagogy within the context of links between electronic business, rhetoric, and composition within an integrated curriculum of a business college. In using the tools to uncover the unexamined differences within the New York Association for Working Girls, I define the pedagogical unconscious of a team-taught MBA course that integrates business communications. I use the elements I identify to construct a new pedagogy that I believe is just and inclusive to all when used to teach business communications in a technological age.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectLanguage, Rhetoric and Composition.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorEnos, Theresaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3010241en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b41711117en_US
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