First-year induction experiences of University of Arizona secondary education graduates and the potential role of the college in providing inductive support

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289907
Title:
First-year induction experiences of University of Arizona secondary education graduates and the potential role of the college in providing inductive support
Author:
Stowers, Patricia T.
Issue Date:
2003
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to collect from University of Arizona secondary education graduates information regarding first-year employment and retention, perceived professional preparedness, perceived effectiveness as first-year teachers, types and perceived effectiveness of district induction support, and interest in receiving induction support from the university in the first year of teaching. This information would shed light on the potential role of the university in providing inductive support to graduates. Eighty-three percent of respondents entered teaching, and 93% were still teaching at the time of the study. However, 35% either planned to leave or contemplated leaving the profession in the future. Many experienced challenging first-year assignments. For respondents in their first-year of teaching, the decision to remain in teaching was linked to perceptions of teaching effectiveness and the effectiveness of induction received. Graduates felt "somewhat prepared" to teach upon graduation, except for master's program graduates who felt significantly better prepared. They felt "somewhat effective" as first-year teachers. There was a positive correlation between perceived preparedness and first-year teaching effectiveness. Respondents recommended modifications to preservice programs, including more coursework in classroom management and planning, extended time in schools, and increased relevance of coursework. The quality of district inductive support varied tremendously, with many receiving insufficient support, particularly from rural or charter schools. The most common support included administrative observations and orientations. Far fewer were mentored, provided with professional training or support sessions, observed by staff development specialists, or given release time to observe others. Respondents felt their district induction was "not very effective." There was a positive correlation between perceived first-year teaching effectiveness and effectiveness of induction. Finally, 79% would have been interested in receiving assistance from the university during their first year, requesting training in classroom management, planning, and content-specific methods. They also recommended support sessions for new teachers, observations, and on-line support. It was concluded that the university could play a valuable role in providing inductive support to graduates.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Teacher Training.
Degree Name:
Ed.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Education
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Streitmatter, Janice

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleFirst-year induction experiences of University of Arizona secondary education graduates and the potential role of the college in providing inductive supporten_US
dc.creatorStowers, Patricia T.en_US
dc.contributor.authorStowers, Patricia T.en_US
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to collect from University of Arizona secondary education graduates information regarding first-year employment and retention, perceived professional preparedness, perceived effectiveness as first-year teachers, types and perceived effectiveness of district induction support, and interest in receiving induction support from the university in the first year of teaching. This information would shed light on the potential role of the university in providing inductive support to graduates. Eighty-three percent of respondents entered teaching, and 93% were still teaching at the time of the study. However, 35% either planned to leave or contemplated leaving the profession in the future. Many experienced challenging first-year assignments. For respondents in their first-year of teaching, the decision to remain in teaching was linked to perceptions of teaching effectiveness and the effectiveness of induction received. Graduates felt "somewhat prepared" to teach upon graduation, except for master's program graduates who felt significantly better prepared. They felt "somewhat effective" as first-year teachers. There was a positive correlation between perceived preparedness and first-year teaching effectiveness. Respondents recommended modifications to preservice programs, including more coursework in classroom management and planning, extended time in schools, and increased relevance of coursework. The quality of district inductive support varied tremendously, with many receiving insufficient support, particularly from rural or charter schools. The most common support included administrative observations and orientations. Far fewer were mentored, provided with professional training or support sessions, observed by staff development specialists, or given release time to observe others. Respondents felt their district induction was "not very effective." There was a positive correlation between perceived first-year teaching effectiveness and effectiveness of induction. Finally, 79% would have been interested in receiving assistance from the university during their first year, requesting training in classroom management, planning, and content-specific methods. They also recommended support sessions for new teachers, observations, and on-line support. It was concluded that the university could play a valuable role in providing inductive support to graduates.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Teacher Training.en_US
thesis.degree.nameEd.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorStreitmatter, Janiceen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3090012en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b4442579xen_US
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