The development of a miniature imaging system: Design, fabrication and metrology

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289892
Title:
The development of a miniature imaging system: Design, fabrication and metrology
Author:
Lee, Junwon
Issue Date:
2003
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The topic of dissertation is on the development of a miniature imaging device named as multi-modal miniature microscope [a.k.a. 4M Device]. Generally speaking, the development of an optical imaging device involves three main processes: optical design, fabrication and metrology. They are interdependent and often comprise a feedback loop. This dissertation will address these three processes sequentially. The 4M device is miniature compound microscope consisting of miniature optics, electronic imaging device, and mechanical device. Every component is integrated on single silicon substrate. The main purpose of 4M device is to provide an imaging capability for the detection of pre-cancer without biopsy. It uses a novel optics called hybrid lens that is fabricated by using a grayscale photomask and photolithographic technique. The hybrid lens is made of sot-gel material and glass substrate. It has 1.2mm of diameter and its surface is conic. Given lens design constraints from the fabrication, the series of lens design for 4M device are implemented and presented. Each design delivers diffraction-limited imaging performance with N.A ranging from 0.4 to 0.7. The 4M device that is currently built has 0.4 of N.A. The imaging quality assessments of 4M device are also implemented in quantitative and qualitative ways. There are two instruments for imaging quality assessment: Multi-modal imaging testbed for entire imaging device and Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor for individual element. The qualitative assessment includes multi-modal imaging experiments under different illumination modes. The object is a cervical cancer cell prepared by Dr. Kortum's Group at Univ. of Texas at Austin. The qualitative assessment includes the surface characterization and wavefront measurement of individual optics and the MTF measurement of entire device. The results of imaging quality assessment show the potential of 4M device for medical imaging device. They also explain the degradation of imaging quality.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Physics, Optics.; Biophysics, Medical.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Optical Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Descour, Michael R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe development of a miniature imaging system: Design, fabrication and metrologyen_US
dc.creatorLee, Junwonen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, Junwonen_US
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe topic of dissertation is on the development of a miniature imaging device named as multi-modal miniature microscope [a.k.a. 4M Device]. Generally speaking, the development of an optical imaging device involves three main processes: optical design, fabrication and metrology. They are interdependent and often comprise a feedback loop. This dissertation will address these three processes sequentially. The 4M device is miniature compound microscope consisting of miniature optics, electronic imaging device, and mechanical device. Every component is integrated on single silicon substrate. The main purpose of 4M device is to provide an imaging capability for the detection of pre-cancer without biopsy. It uses a novel optics called hybrid lens that is fabricated by using a grayscale photomask and photolithographic technique. The hybrid lens is made of sot-gel material and glass substrate. It has 1.2mm of diameter and its surface is conic. Given lens design constraints from the fabrication, the series of lens design for 4M device are implemented and presented. Each design delivers diffraction-limited imaging performance with N.A ranging from 0.4 to 0.7. The 4M device that is currently built has 0.4 of N.A. The imaging quality assessments of 4M device are also implemented in quantitative and qualitative ways. There are two instruments for imaging quality assessment: Multi-modal imaging testbed for entire imaging device and Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor for individual element. The qualitative assessment includes multi-modal imaging experiments under different illumination modes. The object is a cervical cancer cell prepared by Dr. Kortum's Group at Univ. of Texas at Austin. The qualitative assessment includes the surface characterization and wavefront measurement of individual optics and the MTF measurement of entire device. The results of imaging quality assessment show the potential of 4M device for medical imaging device. They also explain the degradation of imaging quality.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPhysics, Optics.en_US
dc.subjectBiophysics, Medical.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineOptical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDescour, Michael R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3089971en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b44422714en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.