Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289873
Title:
Effects of musical sound on the germination of seeds
Author:
Creath, Katherine
Issue Date:
2003
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A series of five experiments were performed to determine if musical sound had a different effect than non-musical sound on the germination of zucchini and okra seeds when compared to a control. Musical sound for this study was a collection of improvised works performed by R. Carlos Nakai and Paul Horn. Predominant instrumentation was different types of flute with some selections for soprano saxophone or bass voice. Non-musical sound was "pink" noise used to test loudspeakers. The first three experiments compared musical sound to a control. The last two experiments compared musical sound to non-musical sound to a control. The number of seeds that had sprouted was counted every 12 hours over a 72-hour time span. Data from the germination of 3,600 seeds over a total of 14 runs for the five experiments were examined using five-way analyses of variance of mixed design. The main effect for musical sound versus control over all five experiments was highly significant (p < 0.002). Positional location, temperature and seed type were shown not to be factors. Over the eight runs of the last two experiments (2,400 seeds) there were no significant interactions between non-musical sound and control. The two-way interaction between condition and time for the three conditions of musical sound, non-musical sound and control was statistically significant (p < 0.03) indicating that the musical sound used for this study had a greater effect than the non-musical sound. These results imply that effects of musical sound extend beyond the psychological and suggest the possibility that musical sound can have physiological effects on biological systems.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Music.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Music and Dance
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Kolosick, J. Timothy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleEffects of musical sound on the germination of seedsen_US
dc.creatorCreath, Katherineen_US
dc.contributor.authorCreath, Katherineen_US
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA series of five experiments were performed to determine if musical sound had a different effect than non-musical sound on the germination of zucchini and okra seeds when compared to a control. Musical sound for this study was a collection of improvised works performed by R. Carlos Nakai and Paul Horn. Predominant instrumentation was different types of flute with some selections for soprano saxophone or bass voice. Non-musical sound was "pink" noise used to test loudspeakers. The first three experiments compared musical sound to a control. The last two experiments compared musical sound to non-musical sound to a control. The number of seeds that had sprouted was counted every 12 hours over a 72-hour time span. Data from the germination of 3,600 seeds over a total of 14 runs for the five experiments were examined using five-way analyses of variance of mixed design. The main effect for musical sound versus control over all five experiments was highly significant (p < 0.002). Positional location, temperature and seed type were shown not to be factors. Over the eight runs of the last two experiments (2,400 seeds) there were no significant interactions between non-musical sound and control. The two-way interaction between condition and time for the three conditions of musical sound, non-musical sound and control was statistically significant (p < 0.03) indicating that the musical sound used for this study had a greater effect than the non-musical sound. These results imply that effects of musical sound extend beyond the psychological and suggest the possibility that musical sound can have physiological effects on biological systems.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectMusic.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMusic and Danceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKolosick, J. Timothyen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3089930en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b44419545en_US
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