Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289851
Title:
Gender and juvenile offending: An exploratory study
Author:
Kirkpatrick, Jennifer Braden
Issue Date:
2002
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Research on juvenile delinquency and antisocial behavior has focused almost exclusively on males. The lack of knowledge about females who demonstrate antisocial behaviors is problematic because arrests involving females are increasing at a greater rate than those involving males. Although some would explain the development of female antisocial behavior using models developed for males, literature on gender differences suggests that this comparison is inappropriate. In a retrospective study of data from a local juvenile detention center, I investigated patterns over time and differences between males and females in number, severity, and type of referrals, number of risk factors, and age of first offense. Based on this analysis, similarities and differences between males and females in antisocial behavior are described and compared to existing literature. Categories of juvenile offenders are proposed and related to existing models of the development of female and male antisocial behavior. The sample was drawn from 46,374 males and 27,447 females referred to the Pima County Juvenile Detention Center between December 31, 1979 and December 31, 2000. Results of data analyses showed that males are responsible for substantially more referrals than females. Further, there may be differing influences on males and females based on differential changes in the rate of referrals for certain time periods. Results of cluster analyses supported three categories of male and of female juvenile offenders---normative, moderate, and severe. Cluster membership is based on total number of referrals committed, severity of most severe offense committed, and a part risk score. Results of an analysis of variance indicated that age of first offense is significantly different for each gender and cluster. Evidence supported the contention that previous models of the development of male antisocial behavior are not adequate to explain female antisocial behavior. Differences between males and females illustrate that although outcomes for male and female adolescents may be similar, the processes leading to these outcomes may be different. Future research should focus on increasing knowledge on risk factors, developmental pathways, and adult outcomes for females who exhibit antisocial behavior.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Behavioral.; Psychology, Developmental.; Sociology, Criminology and Penology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Educational Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Sabers, Darrell L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleGender and juvenile offending: An exploratory studyen_US
dc.creatorKirkpatrick, Jennifer Bradenen_US
dc.contributor.authorKirkpatrick, Jennifer Bradenen_US
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractResearch on juvenile delinquency and antisocial behavior has focused almost exclusively on males. The lack of knowledge about females who demonstrate antisocial behaviors is problematic because arrests involving females are increasing at a greater rate than those involving males. Although some would explain the development of female antisocial behavior using models developed for males, literature on gender differences suggests that this comparison is inappropriate. In a retrospective study of data from a local juvenile detention center, I investigated patterns over time and differences between males and females in number, severity, and type of referrals, number of risk factors, and age of first offense. Based on this analysis, similarities and differences between males and females in antisocial behavior are described and compared to existing literature. Categories of juvenile offenders are proposed and related to existing models of the development of female and male antisocial behavior. The sample was drawn from 46,374 males and 27,447 females referred to the Pima County Juvenile Detention Center between December 31, 1979 and December 31, 2000. Results of data analyses showed that males are responsible for substantially more referrals than females. Further, there may be differing influences on males and females based on differential changes in the rate of referrals for certain time periods. Results of cluster analyses supported three categories of male and of female juvenile offenders---normative, moderate, and severe. Cluster membership is based on total number of referrals committed, severity of most severe offense committed, and a part risk score. Results of an analysis of variance indicated that age of first offense is significantly different for each gender and cluster. Evidence supported the contention that previous models of the development of male antisocial behavior are not adequate to explain female antisocial behavior. Differences between males and females illustrate that although outcomes for male and female adolescents may be similar, the processes leading to these outcomes may be different. Future research should focus on increasing knowledge on risk factors, developmental pathways, and adult outcomes for females who exhibit antisocial behavior.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Behavioral.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Developmental.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Criminology and Penology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSabers, Darrell L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3073239en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b43472059en_US
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