An archaeology of destruction: Households and the use of domestic space at iron II Tel Halif

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289845
Title:
An archaeology of destruction: Households and the use of domestic space at iron II Tel Halif
Author:
Hardin, James Walker
Issue Date:
2001
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The dissertation investigates household organization for the inhabitants of southern Judah during the Iron Age II (late 8th century B.C.E.). It specifically attempts to broaden our understanding of the social unit which occupies the pillared dwellings so prevalent throughout the southern Levant during this time. This understanding comes through a spatial analysis of the de facto refuse from a single pillared dwelling preserved well in a destruction stratum and excavated at Tel Halif in southern Israel. Patterns observed in the occurrences, distributions, and frequencies of the de facto refuse, especially the ceramics, are associated with past activities and activity areas and used to infer the socio-economic organization of the occupants of the pillared dwelling, but only after patterns introduced by formation processes in various contexts are isolated and accounted for. Organization of the dwelling's space and inhabitants is inferred using ethnographic and ethnoarchaeological data and archaeometric techniques, and an "archaeological household" is identified. This is compared with the biblically reconstructed household, but only after the use of biblical texts for historical reconstructions of the Iron II is addressed. Thus, in addition to study of the Iron II household, the dissertation determines the usefulness of destruction strata from tell-type sites of the southern Levant, particularly ceramics, for reconstructing household organization. It also examines the "goodness of fit" between archaeological and biblical reconstructions for the Iron II household of the southern Levant--two disparate and sometimes dialectical sources of data.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Anthropology, Archaeology.; History, Ancient.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Near Eastern Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Dever, William G.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleAn archaeology of destruction: Households and the use of domestic space at iron II Tel Halifen_US
dc.creatorHardin, James Walkeren_US
dc.contributor.authorHardin, James Walkeren_US
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe dissertation investigates household organization for the inhabitants of southern Judah during the Iron Age II (late 8th century B.C.E.). It specifically attempts to broaden our understanding of the social unit which occupies the pillared dwellings so prevalent throughout the southern Levant during this time. This understanding comes through a spatial analysis of the de facto refuse from a single pillared dwelling preserved well in a destruction stratum and excavated at Tel Halif in southern Israel. Patterns observed in the occurrences, distributions, and frequencies of the de facto refuse, especially the ceramics, are associated with past activities and activity areas and used to infer the socio-economic organization of the occupants of the pillared dwelling, but only after patterns introduced by formation processes in various contexts are isolated and accounted for. Organization of the dwelling's space and inhabitants is inferred using ethnographic and ethnoarchaeological data and archaeometric techniques, and an "archaeological household" is identified. This is compared with the biblically reconstructed household, but only after the use of biblical texts for historical reconstructions of the Iron II is addressed. Thus, in addition to study of the Iron II household, the dissertation determines the usefulness of destruction strata from tell-type sites of the southern Levant, particularly ceramics, for reconstructing household organization. It also examines the "goodness of fit" between archaeological and biblical reconstructions for the Iron II household of the southern Levant--two disparate and sometimes dialectical sources of data.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Archaeology.en_US
dc.subjectHistory, Ancient.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNear Eastern Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDever, William G.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3010224en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b41611846en_US
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