Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289836
Title:
Memory errors in elementary school children
Author:
Forrest, Tammy J.
Issue Date:
2002
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Using the DRM paradigm and a short story format, elementary age children demonstrate immediate false recall and recognition effects. Results from using the DRM lists showed that, relative to adult false recall levels, older children falsely recalled fewer critical words from DRM lists, and younger children's false recall of critical words was near floor levels, suggesting that gist processing did not predominate during the free recall task. Developmental trends were not in the direction of increased accuracy in memory performance, but rather in the direction of increased false memory. Contradiction within a short story format increased levels of false memory in younger and older children to levels that were not reliably different from information that repeated sentence meaning. Results from both experiments demonstrate that increases in false memory occurred when gist memory representations were strengthened, i.e., when the meaning of words or sentences was repeated. False memory effects were more pronounced over a delay interval. Fuzzy trace theory's assumptions explain the preponderance of the memory testing results obtained in these two experiments. Results run counter to suggestibility studies, where younger children produce false memory that surpasses older children and adults.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Developmental.; Psychology, Cognitive.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Special Education, Rehabilitation, and School Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Brainerd, Charles J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleMemory errors in elementary school childrenen_US
dc.creatorForrest, Tammy J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorForrest, Tammy J.en_US
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractUsing the DRM paradigm and a short story format, elementary age children demonstrate immediate false recall and recognition effects. Results from using the DRM lists showed that, relative to adult false recall levels, older children falsely recalled fewer critical words from DRM lists, and younger children's false recall of critical words was near floor levels, suggesting that gist processing did not predominate during the free recall task. Developmental trends were not in the direction of increased accuracy in memory performance, but rather in the direction of increased false memory. Contradiction within a short story format increased levels of false memory in younger and older children to levels that were not reliably different from information that repeated sentence meaning. Results from both experiments demonstrate that increases in false memory occurred when gist memory representations were strengthened, i.e., when the meaning of words or sentences was repeated. False memory effects were more pronounced over a delay interval. Fuzzy trace theory's assumptions explain the preponderance of the memory testing results obtained in these two experiments. Results run counter to suggestibility studies, where younger children produce false memory that surpasses older children and adults.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Developmental.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Cognitive.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpecial Education, Rehabilitation, and School Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBrainerd, Charles J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3061005en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b43042326en_US
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