The politics of disease: Imperial medicine and the American Indian, 1797-1871

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289800
Title:
The politics of disease: Imperial medicine and the American Indian, 1797-1871
Author:
Pearson, Jestle Diane
Issue Date:
2001
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Western medicine was utilized as an instrument of empire in colonies established by conquest, occupation, and settlement and was practiced on American Indians between 1797 and 1871. This was medicine in the agents, knowledge and processes of western physicians, western medical "advances" and western medical practices that became part and parcel of the disease experiences of Native Americans and developing federal health care policies. Western medicine, in the form of imperial medicine, was political, economical, military and racial in nature and served to legitimize a federal presence in north American Indian communities. Physicians, missionaries, politicians, traders and the United States army employed western medicine to exacerbate expansion of the United States and the "civilization" of the American Indian. Practitioners of secular western medicine presumed that biomedicine was superior to all other forms of medicine as they attempted to eradicate Native American health care practices. Proponents of western medicine controlled access to western medical benefits, denigrated American Indian women, and misinterpreted American Indian responses to epidemic diseases. The diseases most often carried into Indian Country during western expansion were smallpox, cholera, syphilis and gonorrhea. Federal vaccination efforts, medical benefits treaties, traders' and the military's efforts to contend with these diseases played a central role in the development of the Imperial medical model. Native Americans accepted western medical practices when they were found effective or refused those considered untimely, or inappropriate as they cared for themselves and each other.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
American Studies.; Sociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; American Indian Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Holm, Tom

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe politics of disease: Imperial medicine and the American Indian, 1797-1871en_US
dc.creatorPearson, Jestle Dianeen_US
dc.contributor.authorPearson, Jestle Dianeen_US
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractWestern medicine was utilized as an instrument of empire in colonies established by conquest, occupation, and settlement and was practiced on American Indians between 1797 and 1871. This was medicine in the agents, knowledge and processes of western physicians, western medical "advances" and western medical practices that became part and parcel of the disease experiences of Native Americans and developing federal health care policies. Western medicine, in the form of imperial medicine, was political, economical, military and racial in nature and served to legitimize a federal presence in north American Indian communities. Physicians, missionaries, politicians, traders and the United States army employed western medicine to exacerbate expansion of the United States and the "civilization" of the American Indian. Practitioners of secular western medicine presumed that biomedicine was superior to all other forms of medicine as they attempted to eradicate Native American health care practices. Proponents of western medicine controlled access to western medical benefits, denigrated American Indian women, and misinterpreted American Indian responses to epidemic diseases. The diseases most often carried into Indian Country during western expansion were smallpox, cholera, syphilis and gonorrhea. Federal vaccination efforts, medical benefits treaties, traders' and the military's efforts to contend with these diseases played a central role in the development of the Imperial medical model. Native Americans accepted western medical practices when they were found effective or refused those considered untimely, or inappropriate as they cared for themselves and each other.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAmerican Studies.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAmerican Indian Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHolm, Tomen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3010210en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b41611652en_US
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