Synthesis and characterization of galactosyl lipids that bind HIV-1 gp120

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289764
Title:
Synthesis and characterization of galactosyl lipids that bind HIV-1 gp120
Author:
Labell, Rachel
Issue Date:
2001
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The HIV-1 virus has a protein, gp120, on its surface that is responsible for the initial recognition between the virus and human cells by binding to the CD4 receptor, which is found on many types of human cells. An alternative receptor, galactosylceramide (GalCer), has also been identified. It binds to HIV-1 gp120 and facilitates the infection of human cells via a CD4 independent mechanism. The goal of this research project was to design, synthesize, and test the effectiveness of galactosyl lipids that bind to gp120. A versatile synthesis was developed and used to synthesize five different GalCer analogs. Professor Scott Saavedra and coworkers used total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRF) to measure quantitative binding affinities to gp120 at equilibrium for each glycolipid analog. A GalCer analog with octadecyl lipid chains and a tetraethylene glycol spacter group had the highest binding affinity of the analogs tested. Monolayers of lipid mixtures were investigated for phase behavior using epifluorescence microscopy. It was determined that GalCer analogs with saturated tails formed domains in monolayers with DOPC. GalCer analogs were also incorporated into liposomes and were subjected to an HIV-1 inhibition assay in Dr. Ahmad's lab. The GalCer analog liposomes showed similar inhibition as GalCer liposomes.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Chemistry, Biochemistry.; Chemistry, Organic.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Chemistry
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
O'Brien, David F.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleSynthesis and characterization of galactosyl lipids that bind HIV-1 gp120en_US
dc.creatorLabell, Rachelen_US
dc.contributor.authorLabell, Rachelen_US
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe HIV-1 virus has a protein, gp120, on its surface that is responsible for the initial recognition between the virus and human cells by binding to the CD4 receptor, which is found on many types of human cells. An alternative receptor, galactosylceramide (GalCer), has also been identified. It binds to HIV-1 gp120 and facilitates the infection of human cells via a CD4 independent mechanism. The goal of this research project was to design, synthesize, and test the effectiveness of galactosyl lipids that bind to gp120. A versatile synthesis was developed and used to synthesize five different GalCer analogs. Professor Scott Saavedra and coworkers used total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRF) to measure quantitative binding affinities to gp120 at equilibrium for each glycolipid analog. A GalCer analog with octadecyl lipid chains and a tetraethylene glycol spacter group had the highest binding affinity of the analogs tested. Monolayers of lipid mixtures were investigated for phase behavior using epifluorescence microscopy. It was determined that GalCer analogs with saturated tails formed domains in monolayers with DOPC. GalCer analogs were also incorporated into liposomes and were subjected to an HIV-1 inhibition assay in Dr. Ahmad's lab. The GalCer analog liposomes showed similar inhibition as GalCer liposomes.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectChemistry, Biochemistry.en_US
dc.subjectChemistry, Organic.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineChemistryen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorO'Brien, David F.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3040155en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b42566034en_US
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