Neuroanatomical correlates of memory and emotional functioning in temporal lobe epilepsy

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289735
Title:
Neuroanatomical correlates of memory and emotional functioning in temporal lobe epilepsy
Author:
Reminger, Sheryl Louise
Issue Date:
2001
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The present study examined the relationships between quantitative volume estimates of mesial temporal lobe structures based on structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the memory and emotional functioning of individuals with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Twenty individuals identified as having TLE and 24 control participants were administered a test battery that included an experimental recognition memory test incorporating both verbal and nonverbal stimuli, an experimental test of emotional functioning that measured both subjective report and skin conductance response (SCR) to emotionally salient stimuli, and a battery of standardized tests and questionnaires assessing attention, personality, and emotion perception. Patients also completed standardized measures assessing intellectual function, memory, and quality of life. The patient group demonstrated deficits on tests of memory, attention, and emotion perception. Patients also demonstrated reduced SCR, however this result was found in response to both emotional and nonemotional stimuli and so is not necessarily indicative of deficits in emotional arousal. Inconsistent with expectations, patients reported normal experiential states of arousal in response to emotionally salient stimuli. MRI data were used to measure left- and right-hemisphere volumes of the hippocampus and amygdala in the patient group, and these volumes were used as predictors of performance on behavioral measures in multiple regression analyses. Consistent with predictions, reduced amygdala volume predicted lower arousal ratings to positive emotional stimuli. However, a similar relationship was not found for arousal ratings of negative stimuli. Other predicted relationships were not demonstrated. Amygdala volume did not show a relationship with SCR, and hippocampal volume did not show a relationship with memory performance. Additional hypotheses regarding the lateralization of hippocampal and amygdala function were not supported. Results of standardized tests suggested some potential relationships between hippocampal volume and attention, and between amygdala volume and psychological characteristics, although further research would be needed to establish the degree to which these results could be generalized to a larger population. Study findings support the continued development of NM morphometric techniques to predict patterns of strengths and weaknesses demonstrated by individuals with TLE.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Psychobiology.; Psychology, Clinical.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Kaszniak, Alfred W.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleNeuroanatomical correlates of memory and emotional functioning in temporal lobe epilepsyen_US
dc.creatorReminger, Sheryl Louiseen_US
dc.contributor.authorReminger, Sheryl Louiseen_US
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe present study examined the relationships between quantitative volume estimates of mesial temporal lobe structures based on structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the memory and emotional functioning of individuals with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Twenty individuals identified as having TLE and 24 control participants were administered a test battery that included an experimental recognition memory test incorporating both verbal and nonverbal stimuli, an experimental test of emotional functioning that measured both subjective report and skin conductance response (SCR) to emotionally salient stimuli, and a battery of standardized tests and questionnaires assessing attention, personality, and emotion perception. Patients also completed standardized measures assessing intellectual function, memory, and quality of life. The patient group demonstrated deficits on tests of memory, attention, and emotion perception. Patients also demonstrated reduced SCR, however this result was found in response to both emotional and nonemotional stimuli and so is not necessarily indicative of deficits in emotional arousal. Inconsistent with expectations, patients reported normal experiential states of arousal in response to emotionally salient stimuli. MRI data were used to measure left- and right-hemisphere volumes of the hippocampus and amygdala in the patient group, and these volumes were used as predictors of performance on behavioral measures in multiple regression analyses. Consistent with predictions, reduced amygdala volume predicted lower arousal ratings to positive emotional stimuli. However, a similar relationship was not found for arousal ratings of negative stimuli. Other predicted relationships were not demonstrated. Amygdala volume did not show a relationship with SCR, and hippocampal volume did not show a relationship with memory performance. Additional hypotheses regarding the lateralization of hippocampal and amygdala function were not supported. Results of standardized tests suggested some potential relationships between hippocampal volume and attention, and between amygdala volume and psychological characteristics, although further research would be needed to establish the degree to which these results could be generalized to a larger population. Study findings support the continued development of NM morphometric techniques to predict patterns of strengths and weaknesses demonstrated by individuals with TLE.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Psychobiology.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Clinical.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKaszniak, Alfred W.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3031381en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b42286426en_US
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