Family influences on adolescent depression and delinquency: Gender differences in risk

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289717
Title:
Family influences on adolescent depression and delinquency: Gender differences in risk
Author:
Herrera, Veronica Marina
Issue Date:
2001
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Using a community sample of 296 youth participating in a longitudinal study, this study sought to explore: (1) gender differences in rates and patterns of offending; (2) gender differences in pathways between childhood and adolescent family risk factors, adolescent depression, and juvenile delinquency and (3) childhood sexual abuse as a risk factor of female delinquency? Structural equations models were initially run separately for girls and boys. Early exposure to family violence did not predict delinquency for either sex. It did influence later parenting practices for girls' only. Girls depression was also affected by current parenting practices. Parenting in adolescence did not predict girls' delinquency, although the relationship approached significance in the predicted direction. Only girls' depression was significantly related to girls' delinquency. For boys, the only significant relationship in the model was between parenting in adolescence and juvenile delinquency. Although the patterns of associations between the girls' and boys' models appear to differ, multi-group structural equation models tested whether the pathways between constructs statistically differed by sex. Results from these analyses indicate that the pathways between parenting in adolescence and depression, and depression and delinquency are significantly more relevant for girls than for boys. The final model including sexual abuse, was tested for girls only. Child sexual abuse affected parenting in adolescence and also predicted adolescent depression. Although childhood sexual abuse failed to directly predict delinquency, the pathway emerged as a trend.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Social.; Psychology, Clinical.; Sociology, Criminology and Penology.; Sociology, Individual and Family Studies.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
McCloskey, Laura; Becker, Judith

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleFamily influences on adolescent depression and delinquency: Gender differences in risken_US
dc.creatorHerrera, Veronica Marinaen_US
dc.contributor.authorHerrera, Veronica Marinaen_US
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractUsing a community sample of 296 youth participating in a longitudinal study, this study sought to explore: (1) gender differences in rates and patterns of offending; (2) gender differences in pathways between childhood and adolescent family risk factors, adolescent depression, and juvenile delinquency and (3) childhood sexual abuse as a risk factor of female delinquency? Structural equations models were initially run separately for girls and boys. Early exposure to family violence did not predict delinquency for either sex. It did influence later parenting practices for girls' only. Girls depression was also affected by current parenting practices. Parenting in adolescence did not predict girls' delinquency, although the relationship approached significance in the predicted direction. Only girls' depression was significantly related to girls' delinquency. For boys, the only significant relationship in the model was between parenting in adolescence and juvenile delinquency. Although the patterns of associations between the girls' and boys' models appear to differ, multi-group structural equation models tested whether the pathways between constructs statistically differed by sex. Results from these analyses indicate that the pathways between parenting in adolescence and depression, and depression and delinquency are significantly more relevant for girls than for boys. The final model including sexual abuse, was tested for girls only. Child sexual abuse affected parenting in adolescence and also predicted adolescent depression. Although childhood sexual abuse failed to directly predict delinquency, the pathway emerged as a trend.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Social.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Clinical.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Criminology and Penology.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Individual and Family Studies.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMcCloskey, Lauraen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBecker, Judithen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3026574en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b42177674en_US
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