Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289688
Title:
A diffractive optic image spectrometer (DOIS)
Author:
Blanchard Lyons, Denise Marie, 1967-
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The diffractive optic imaging spectrometer, DOIS, is a high resolution, compact, economical, rugged, programmable, multi-spectral imager. The design implements a conventional CCD camera and emerging diffractive optical element (DOE) technology in an elegant configuration, adding spectroscopy capabilities to current imaging systems. One limitation of DOEs, also known as zone plate lenses, is abundant chromatic aberration. DOIS exploits this typically unwanted effect, utilizing a DOE to perform the imaging and provide the dispersion necessary to separate a multi-spectral target into separate spectral images. The CCD is stepped or scanned along the optical axis recording a series of these spectral images. This process is referred to as diffractive spectral sectioning. Under this dissertation, three-dimensional spectral/spatial DOE imaging theory was developed to describe and predict the system's performance. The theory was implemented in a software model to simulate DOIS image cubes. A visible spectrum DOIS prototype was designed, fabricated and characterized. The system's incoherent point spread function was theoretically modeled and experimentally determined. To verify the simulations, the prototype's performance was demonstrated with a variety of known targets and compared to simulated image cubes. To reconstruct the three-dimensional object cubes, various deconvolution algorithms, nearest neighbor, inverse filtering and constrained iterative deconvolution, were developed and applied to both computer generated and experimentally measured image cubes. The best results were obtained using an SVD inverse Fourier deconvolution algorithm with regularization for noise suppression. The results demonstrate a resolving power greater than 288 (lambda /Deltalambda = 577nm/2nm). Finally, three additional DOIS designs are presented as suggestions for future work, including a configuration with no moving parts which records the entire 3D image cube in one "snapshot". DOIS is a practical image spectrometer that can be built to operate at ultraviolet, visible or infrared wavelengths for applications in surveillance, remote sensing, medical imaging, law enforcement, environmental monitoring, and laser counter intelligence.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Engineering, Electronics and Electrical.; Physics, Optics.; Environmental Sciences.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Optical Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Dereniak, Eustace L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleA diffractive optic image spectrometer (DOIS)en_US
dc.creatorBlanchard Lyons, Denise Marie, 1967-en_US
dc.contributor.authorBlanchard Lyons, Denise Marie, 1967-en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe diffractive optic imaging spectrometer, DOIS, is a high resolution, compact, economical, rugged, programmable, multi-spectral imager. The design implements a conventional CCD camera and emerging diffractive optical element (DOE) technology in an elegant configuration, adding spectroscopy capabilities to current imaging systems. One limitation of DOEs, also known as zone plate lenses, is abundant chromatic aberration. DOIS exploits this typically unwanted effect, utilizing a DOE to perform the imaging and provide the dispersion necessary to separate a multi-spectral target into separate spectral images. The CCD is stepped or scanned along the optical axis recording a series of these spectral images. This process is referred to as diffractive spectral sectioning. Under this dissertation, three-dimensional spectral/spatial DOE imaging theory was developed to describe and predict the system's performance. The theory was implemented in a software model to simulate DOIS image cubes. A visible spectrum DOIS prototype was designed, fabricated and characterized. The system's incoherent point spread function was theoretically modeled and experimentally determined. To verify the simulations, the prototype's performance was demonstrated with a variety of known targets and compared to simulated image cubes. To reconstruct the three-dimensional object cubes, various deconvolution algorithms, nearest neighbor, inverse filtering and constrained iterative deconvolution, were developed and applied to both computer generated and experimentally measured image cubes. The best results were obtained using an SVD inverse Fourier deconvolution algorithm with regularization for noise suppression. The results demonstrate a resolving power greater than 288 (lambda /Deltalambda = 577nm/2nm). Finally, three additional DOIS designs are presented as suggestions for future work, including a configuration with no moving parts which records the entire 3D image cube in one "snapshot". DOIS is a practical image spectrometer that can be built to operate at ultraviolet, visible or infrared wavelengths for applications in surveillance, remote sensing, medical imaging, law enforcement, environmental monitoring, and laser counter intelligence.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Electronics and Electrical.en_US
dc.subjectPhysics, Optics.en_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental Sciences.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineOptical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDereniak, Eustace L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9738976en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b3747683xen_US
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