The demands-control model in fast-food restaurants: Effects of emotional labor, customer treatment, demands, control, and support

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289655
Title:
The demands-control model in fast-food restaurants: Effects of emotional labor, customer treatment, demands, control, and support
Author:
Richmond, Sandra Mansell, 1944-
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In this cross-sectional field study of a fast-food organization, self-report data provided by workers and interview data from managers were used to assess the effects of the work environment on fast-food worker attitudes and behavior. Job demands, worker control and management support (Karasek & Theorell, 1990) were the predictor variables in this research. Additional job demands of emotional labor and customer behavior were measured and tested. Results indicated that control, emotional labor and management support were negatively associated with reported stress and positively associated with reported satisfaction and commitment. Additionally, customer behavior and demands were positively associated with reported stress and customer behavior was negatively associated with reported satisfaction and commitment.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Business Administration, Management.; Psychology, Industrial.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Industrial Management
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Gutek, Barbara A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe demands-control model in fast-food restaurants: Effects of emotional labor, customer treatment, demands, control, and supporten_US
dc.creatorRichmond, Sandra Mansell, 1944-en_US
dc.contributor.authorRichmond, Sandra Mansell, 1944-en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn this cross-sectional field study of a fast-food organization, self-report data provided by workers and interview data from managers were used to assess the effects of the work environment on fast-food worker attitudes and behavior. Job demands, worker control and management support (Karasek & Theorell, 1990) were the predictor variables in this research. Additional job demands of emotional labor and customer behavior were measured and tested. Results indicated that control, emotional labor and management support were negatively associated with reported stress and positively associated with reported satisfaction and commitment. Additionally, customer behavior and demands were positively associated with reported stress and customer behavior was negatively associated with reported satisfaction and commitment.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBusiness Administration, Management.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Industrial.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineIndustrial Managementen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGutek, Barbara A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9738971en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b37474856en_US
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