Krzysztof Penderecki's Cadenza for Viola Solo as a derivative of the Concerto for Viola and Orchestra: A numerical analysis and a performer's guide

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289622
Title:
Krzysztof Penderecki's Cadenza for Viola Solo as a derivative of the Concerto for Viola and Orchestra: A numerical analysis and a performer's guide
Author:
Reiter, Erica Amelia, 1968-
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The intent of this study is to explore the musical, structural, and intervallic relationship between Krzysztof Penderecki's two works for viola, the Concerto for Viola and Orchestra and Cadenza for Viola Solo. The Concerto for Viola is a twenty-minute work accompanied by full orchestra; the Cadenza for Viola Solo is an eight-minute solo work. In these viola works, Penderecki has encapsulated the characteristics of the viola: the tone, technical capacity, and character. Both of Penderecki's viola works demand and reinforce the unique qualities of the viola. This document provides a performance guide to help a performer develop more insight and understanding of the viola's individual qualities that are represented in these pieces. The comparison between the Concerto for Viola and Cadenza for Viola Solo is discussed in three sections. First, the two works are divided into logical sections and compared to one another in a parametric structure chart. The musical and structural features discussed in the performance analysis include motivic elements, articulations, rhythmic ideas, dynamics. The highest tier consists of larger concepts, such as structure, phrasing, and sequential patterns. The lower tiers focus on detailed comparisons including dynamics, note patterns, and fingerings. These musical and structural analyses of the Concerto for Viola and Cadenza for Viola Solo are represented in flowcharts. These flowcharts evaluate, along an aerial view, similarities and dissimilarities between sections, the merging of one section with another, and the formal structure of the two works. The second analysis is a process based on applying to each pitch a specific numerical value. Each pitch is assigned a designated number, and the two pieces are compared solely on these numbers. The numbers indicate the intervallic relationships of motives, phrases, and sequences of each work. The numerical comparisons demonstrate consistent correlations between the two works that are not evident through other methods of analysis. Finally, the Cadenza for Viola Solo is analyzed from a performer's perspective. These performance issues focus on certain sections that require more detailed guidance, inclusive of bowing technique, shifting options, vibrato, and dynamic considerations.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Music.
Degree Name:
D.M.A.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Music and Dance
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Showell, Jeffrey

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleKrzysztof Penderecki's Cadenza for Viola Solo as a derivative of the Concerto for Viola and Orchestra: A numerical analysis and a performer's guideen_US
dc.creatorReiter, Erica Amelia, 1968-en_US
dc.contributor.authorReiter, Erica Amelia, 1968-en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe intent of this study is to explore the musical, structural, and intervallic relationship between Krzysztof Penderecki's two works for viola, the Concerto for Viola and Orchestra and Cadenza for Viola Solo. The Concerto for Viola is a twenty-minute work accompanied by full orchestra; the Cadenza for Viola Solo is an eight-minute solo work. In these viola works, Penderecki has encapsulated the characteristics of the viola: the tone, technical capacity, and character. Both of Penderecki's viola works demand and reinforce the unique qualities of the viola. This document provides a performance guide to help a performer develop more insight and understanding of the viola's individual qualities that are represented in these pieces. The comparison between the Concerto for Viola and Cadenza for Viola Solo is discussed in three sections. First, the two works are divided into logical sections and compared to one another in a parametric structure chart. The musical and structural features discussed in the performance analysis include motivic elements, articulations, rhythmic ideas, dynamics. The highest tier consists of larger concepts, such as structure, phrasing, and sequential patterns. The lower tiers focus on detailed comparisons including dynamics, note patterns, and fingerings. These musical and structural analyses of the Concerto for Viola and Cadenza for Viola Solo are represented in flowcharts. These flowcharts evaluate, along an aerial view, similarities and dissimilarities between sections, the merging of one section with another, and the formal structure of the two works. The second analysis is a process based on applying to each pitch a specific numerical value. Each pitch is assigned a designated number, and the two pieces are compared solely on these numbers. The numbers indicate the intervallic relationships of motives, phrases, and sequences of each work. The numerical comparisons demonstrate consistent correlations between the two works that are not evident through other methods of analysis. Finally, the Cadenza for Viola Solo is analyzed from a performer's perspective. These performance issues focus on certain sections that require more detailed guidance, inclusive of bowing technique, shifting options, vibrato, and dynamic considerations.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectMusic.en_US
thesis.degree.nameD.M.A.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMusic and Danceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorShowell, Jeffreyen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9738965en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b37474364en_US
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