Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289444
Title:
Relocation of the population of Al-Habalah Village
Author:
Al-Maharwi, Saad Ali Gana, 1957-
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Al-Habalah Village is located in the Asir region of southwestern Saudi Arabia. The villagers were relocated to King Faisal Model Village in late 1979. The main objectives of this study were to: (1) identify the reason for relocation; (2) assess the outcome of relocation in terms of compensation, hardships, status of activities before and after relocation, and degree of adaptation to the new location; and (3) evaluate the population's current relationship to their former village in terms of ownership, utilization of resources, and access status. The major findings of this study indicate that the main reason for relocation was the village's inaccessible routes, isolation, and complete absence of public services. Hardships associated with the relocation included adaptation to the new environment, preparing farms, and acquiring homes and furniture. Comparison of activities before and after relocation indicates some positive effects of the change. A notable exception is grazing activities which have sharply decreased. The quantity and quality of resources at the new location are variable. For example, the quantity of water is highly dependent on rainfall. Also, the quantity of firewood is limited, except for the distant mountain zone. In addition, while the quality of soils was good, the quality of grazing lands was poor as a direct result of the dominant climate and land development. A notable exception is the mountain zone. Because of the relocatees ownership of their property, such as homes and farms at the former village, they are free to go to their former village and utilize the former village's resources. The study determined that the basic needs which were missing at the former village are found at the new location and the population is satisfied with the outcome of the relocation.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Geography.; Sociology, Public and Social Welfare.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Geography and Regional Development
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Zube, Ervin H.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleRelocation of the population of Al-Habalah Villageen_US
dc.creatorAl-Maharwi, Saad Ali Gana, 1957-en_US
dc.contributor.authorAl-Maharwi, Saad Ali Gana, 1957-en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAl-Habalah Village is located in the Asir region of southwestern Saudi Arabia. The villagers were relocated to King Faisal Model Village in late 1979. The main objectives of this study were to: (1) identify the reason for relocation; (2) assess the outcome of relocation in terms of compensation, hardships, status of activities before and after relocation, and degree of adaptation to the new location; and (3) evaluate the population's current relationship to their former village in terms of ownership, utilization of resources, and access status. The major findings of this study indicate that the main reason for relocation was the village's inaccessible routes, isolation, and complete absence of public services. Hardships associated with the relocation included adaptation to the new environment, preparing farms, and acquiring homes and furniture. Comparison of activities before and after relocation indicates some positive effects of the change. A notable exception is grazing activities which have sharply decreased. The quantity and quality of resources at the new location are variable. For example, the quantity of water is highly dependent on rainfall. Also, the quantity of firewood is limited, except for the distant mountain zone. In addition, while the quality of soils was good, the quality of grazing lands was poor as a direct result of the dominant climate and land development. A notable exception is the mountain zone. Because of the relocatees ownership of their property, such as homes and farms at the former village, they are free to go to their former village and utilize the former village's resources. The study determined that the basic needs which were missing at the former village are found at the new location and the population is satisfied with the outcome of the relocation.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectGeography.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Public and Social Welfare.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeography and Regional Developmenten_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorZube, Ervin H.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9738935en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b37459661en_US
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