Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289411
Title:
Reading as flow: A linguistic alternative to fluency
Author:
Flurkey, Alan D., 1955-
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The relationship between reading and time in the oral reading of an authentic, connected text is conceptualized using a hydrological "flow" metaphor in this theoretical dissertation. The concept of reading fluency in oral and silent reading is critically examined. The concepts of "reading fluency" and "reading rate" have historically been part of a word identification view of reading. In this view, the act of reading is defined as the ability to identify words. Accordingly, reading fluency is characterized as rapid and accurate word identification. In an alternative sociopsycholinguistic transactional view (the view taken in this dissertation) reading is described as a meaning construction process in which a reader constructs a personal meaning by transacting with a written text. The concept of reading fluency is supplanted with a hydrological reading-as-flow metaphor. In this dissertation, a deconstruction of "reading fluency" is initially provided. Next, a definition of "reading flow" is offered along with a procedure for its documentation. The procedure makes extensive use of miscue analysis. This is followed by a fine-grained analysis of reading and time relationships for several readers reading orally. Major findings include that oral reading rate varies throughout a text in response to readers' employment of cognitive reading strategies; reading rate varies for both effective and proficient readers; the variability of reading rate can be represented as a quantity. Implications for a theory of the reading process, a theory of reading instruction, and teacher education are included.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Reading.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Language, Reading and Culture
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Goodman, Yetta M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleReading as flow: A linguistic alternative to fluencyen_US
dc.creatorFlurkey, Alan D., 1955-en_US
dc.contributor.authorFlurkey, Alan D., 1955-en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe relationship between reading and time in the oral reading of an authentic, connected text is conceptualized using a hydrological "flow" metaphor in this theoretical dissertation. The concept of reading fluency in oral and silent reading is critically examined. The concepts of "reading fluency" and "reading rate" have historically been part of a word identification view of reading. In this view, the act of reading is defined as the ability to identify words. Accordingly, reading fluency is characterized as rapid and accurate word identification. In an alternative sociopsycholinguistic transactional view (the view taken in this dissertation) reading is described as a meaning construction process in which a reader constructs a personal meaning by transacting with a written text. The concept of reading fluency is supplanted with a hydrological reading-as-flow metaphor. In this dissertation, a deconstruction of "reading fluency" is initially provided. Next, a definition of "reading flow" is offered along with a procedure for its documentation. The procedure makes extensive use of miscue analysis. This is followed by a fine-grained analysis of reading and time relationships for several readers reading orally. Major findings include that oral reading rate varies throughout a text in response to readers' employment of cognitive reading strategies; reading rate varies for both effective and proficient readers; the variability of reading rate can be represented as a quantity. Implications for a theory of the reading process, a theory of reading instruction, and teacher education are included.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Reading.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLanguage, Reading and Cultureen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGoodman, Yetta M.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9738925en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b37456751en_US
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