The principal's perceived effectiveness of preservice teacher training in Arizona

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289378
Title:
The principal's perceived effectiveness of preservice teacher training in Arizona
Author:
Clement, Nicholas Irving
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study investigated the principal's perceived effectiveness of preservice teaching education and training in the state of Arizona. An in-depth interview methodology was used to explore, describe, and analyze the perceptions of twelve principals serving in K-12 schools located in Southern Arizona. The following questions guided this study: What attitudes, skills and knowledge competencies do principals want new teachers to demonstrate and how do these perceptions compare with profiles developed in the literature? What type of course work do principals want in teacher preservice training programs and how do these perceptions compare with those currently offered in Arizona Colleges of Education? What strengths have principals observed in new teachers and which of these strengths do they attribute directly to preservice training programs in Arizona? What weaknesses have principals observed in new teachers and which of these weaknesses do they attribute directly to preservice training programs in Arizona? What recommendations do principals have for improving preservice training programs in Arizona Colleges of Education? This study was limited in terms of generalizability because only the perceptions of 12 principals serving schools in Southern Arizona were utilized. Qualitative data was collected utilizing individual in-depth interviews with the 12 principals selected for this study. Response data gathered in this study were analyzed inductively in an attempt to develop and identify significant themes, concepts, and dimensions describing the principal's perception of the effectiveness of preservice teacher training. The following findings emerged from this study relative to the principals' perceptions of preservice training: principals have a specific profile of the competent new teacher and this profile parallels the research; principals want teachers to take course work in classroom management, communication and methodology with a emphasis on theory to practice methods; principals characterized new teachers as enthusiastic and strong in content knowledge; principals characterized new teachers as weak in classroom management skills and their ability to deliver instruction; principals recommended that schools of education become more practitioner focused, provide earlier and longer field service, provide immersion type student teaching experiences, and become less isolated and more interdependent in their relationship with K-12 schools.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Administration.; Education, Teacher Training.
Degree Name:
Ed.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Educational Administration and Higher Education
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Clark, Donald

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe principal's perceived effectiveness of preservice teacher training in Arizonaen_US
dc.creatorClement, Nicholas Irvingen_US
dc.contributor.authorClement, Nicholas Irvingen_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated the principal's perceived effectiveness of preservice teaching education and training in the state of Arizona. An in-depth interview methodology was used to explore, describe, and analyze the perceptions of twelve principals serving in K-12 schools located in Southern Arizona. The following questions guided this study: What attitudes, skills and knowledge competencies do principals want new teachers to demonstrate and how do these perceptions compare with profiles developed in the literature? What type of course work do principals want in teacher preservice training programs and how do these perceptions compare with those currently offered in Arizona Colleges of Education? What strengths have principals observed in new teachers and which of these strengths do they attribute directly to preservice training programs in Arizona? What weaknesses have principals observed in new teachers and which of these weaknesses do they attribute directly to preservice training programs in Arizona? What recommendations do principals have for improving preservice training programs in Arizona Colleges of Education? This study was limited in terms of generalizability because only the perceptions of 12 principals serving schools in Southern Arizona were utilized. Qualitative data was collected utilizing individual in-depth interviews with the 12 principals selected for this study. Response data gathered in this study were analyzed inductively in an attempt to develop and identify significant themes, concepts, and dimensions describing the principal's perception of the effectiveness of preservice teacher training. The following findings emerged from this study relative to the principals' perceptions of preservice training: principals have a specific profile of the competent new teacher and this profile parallels the research; principals want teachers to take course work in classroom management, communication and methodology with a emphasis on theory to practice methods; principals characterized new teachers as enthusiastic and strong in content knowledge; principals characterized new teachers as weak in classroom management skills and their ability to deliver instruction; principals recommended that schools of education become more practitioner focused, provide earlier and longer field service, provide immersion type student teaching experiences, and become less isolated and more interdependent in their relationship with K-12 schools.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Administration.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Teacher Training.en_US
thesis.degree.nameEd.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Administration and Higher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorClark, Donalden_US
dc.identifier.proquest9738916en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b37454833en_US
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