Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289355
Title:
Friendship dyads of adolescents with visual impairment
Author:
Rosenblum, Lee Penny, 1964-
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study examined the best friendships of 40 adolescents with visual impairment. Twenty three best friends of these adolescents also participated in the study. The 63 participants completed a Demographic Form, the Intimate Friendship Scale (Sharabany, 1974), and the Telephone Survey. Ten dyads, who were representative of the study sample, were selected for Personal Interviews. Each of the 40 adolescents with visual impairment and the best friend were similar in gender, ethnicity, grade in school, grades earned in school, and dating experience. Twelve of the best friends also had a disability. On the Intimate Friendship Scale both the adolescents with visual impairment and their best friends rated the dimensions of Frankness/Spontaneity, Giving/Sharing, Trust/Loyalty, and Attachment as being the most salient characteristics in the reported best friendship. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) tests to examine the effect of gender (male, female), vision status (blind, low vision), and grade group (junior high school, senior high school) yielded significant interaction effects for Frankness/Spontaneity and Trust/Loyalty. The majority of response for where friends spent time together was in the home environment, with the most common activities they reported doing together being hobbies. When talking together both members of the friendship dyad most frequently reported topics around other people and hobbies. Few study participants reported that the visual impairment impacted the activities the friends could do together. The activities that were difficult were ball sports and watching movies. When the 23 best friends reported how their time with another best or close friend was spent, there were few reported differences from how they spent time with the adolescent with visual impairment. Adolescents with visual impairment established reciprocal friendships which had high levels of intimacy and were similar to those of sighted peers. Together the friends engaged in activities typical of nondisabled adolescents. Participants in this study appeared to recognize the limitations of the visual impairment and to adapt interactions appropriately. There were not major differences in the reported friendships of study participants compared to adolescents described in the literature.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Social.; Education, Special.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Special Education and Rehabilitation
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Erin, Jane N.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleFriendship dyads of adolescents with visual impairmenten_US
dc.creatorRosenblum, Lee Penny, 1964-en_US
dc.contributor.authorRosenblum, Lee Penny, 1964-en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study examined the best friendships of 40 adolescents with visual impairment. Twenty three best friends of these adolescents also participated in the study. The 63 participants completed a Demographic Form, the Intimate Friendship Scale (Sharabany, 1974), and the Telephone Survey. Ten dyads, who were representative of the study sample, were selected for Personal Interviews. Each of the 40 adolescents with visual impairment and the best friend were similar in gender, ethnicity, grade in school, grades earned in school, and dating experience. Twelve of the best friends also had a disability. On the Intimate Friendship Scale both the adolescents with visual impairment and their best friends rated the dimensions of Frankness/Spontaneity, Giving/Sharing, Trust/Loyalty, and Attachment as being the most salient characteristics in the reported best friendship. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) tests to examine the effect of gender (male, female), vision status (blind, low vision), and grade group (junior high school, senior high school) yielded significant interaction effects for Frankness/Spontaneity and Trust/Loyalty. The majority of response for where friends spent time together was in the home environment, with the most common activities they reported doing together being hobbies. When talking together both members of the friendship dyad most frequently reported topics around other people and hobbies. Few study participants reported that the visual impairment impacted the activities the friends could do together. The activities that were difficult were ball sports and watching movies. When the 23 best friends reported how their time with another best or close friend was spent, there were few reported differences from how they spent time with the adolescent with visual impairment. Adolescents with visual impairment established reciprocal friendships which had high levels of intimacy and were similar to those of sighted peers. Together the friends engaged in activities typical of nondisabled adolescents. Participants in this study appeared to recognize the limitations of the visual impairment and to adapt interactions appropriately. There were not major differences in the reported friendships of study participants compared to adolescents described in the literature.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Social.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Special.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpecial Education and Rehabilitationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorErin, Jane N.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9729535en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b34841295en_US
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