How higher educational institutions deal with reported incidents of sexual assault

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289344
Title:
How higher educational institutions deal with reported incidents of sexual assault
Author:
Hueston, Harry Raymond, 1949-
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Based on an examination of 47 campus-police reports of sexual assaults at three Southwestern universities, this study identifies and documents the social conditions that frequently lead to and surround campus rape; by comparing these conditions with those found in several national studies, this researcher finds a number of consistencies in suspects' and victims' characteristics, location of the crime, date and time of occurrence, and substance abuse. In addition, this study documents elements of male domination and sex-role stereotyping, the influence of rape mythology, and a negotiation process in which victims engage before they conclude that they are victims and report the crime. The study also examines the way in which universities apply or do not apply their own codes of conduct to campus rape cases and the way in which the criminal-justice system manages such cases. Using the documentation in the 47 campus-police reports, this study finds patterns in the steps rape victims take, campus police procedures for presenting campus rapes to prosecutors, prosecutors' decision-making processes, and reasons given by prosecuting attorneys when they fail to prosecute student suspects. The pattern of failing to treat campus rape as a serious crime is consistent on university campuses and in the criminal justice system. The criminal-justice system seldom prosecutes, indicts, or sentences students suspected of rape, whereas those accused of other crimes are more frequently brought to justice. Likewise, university administrators impose only minimal, if any, sanctions against students identified as rapists. Finally, the study provides important information with which to understand the environment in which rape occurs and the gender biases on which both university administrations and the criminal-justice system base their assumptions, policies, programs, discipline, and justice. This information is presented so that those in academic and judicial authority can develop improved programs and strategies to prevent campus rape.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Women's Studies.; Education, Administration.; Sociology, Criminology and Penology.; Education, Higher.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Higher Education
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Slaughter, Shiela

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleHow higher educational institutions deal with reported incidents of sexual assaulten_US
dc.creatorHueston, Harry Raymond, 1949-en_US
dc.contributor.authorHueston, Harry Raymond, 1949-en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractBased on an examination of 47 campus-police reports of sexual assaults at three Southwestern universities, this study identifies and documents the social conditions that frequently lead to and surround campus rape; by comparing these conditions with those found in several national studies, this researcher finds a number of consistencies in suspects' and victims' characteristics, location of the crime, date and time of occurrence, and substance abuse. In addition, this study documents elements of male domination and sex-role stereotyping, the influence of rape mythology, and a negotiation process in which victims engage before they conclude that they are victims and report the crime. The study also examines the way in which universities apply or do not apply their own codes of conduct to campus rape cases and the way in which the criminal-justice system manages such cases. Using the documentation in the 47 campus-police reports, this study finds patterns in the steps rape victims take, campus police procedures for presenting campus rapes to prosecutors, prosecutors' decision-making processes, and reasons given by prosecuting attorneys when they fail to prosecute student suspects. The pattern of failing to treat campus rape as a serious crime is consistent on university campuses and in the criminal justice system. The criminal-justice system seldom prosecutes, indicts, or sentences students suspected of rape, whereas those accused of other crimes are more frequently brought to justice. Likewise, university administrators impose only minimal, if any, sanctions against students identified as rapists. Finally, the study provides important information with which to understand the environment in which rape occurs and the gender biases on which both university administrations and the criminal-justice system base their assumptions, policies, programs, discipline, and justice. This information is presented so that those in academic and judicial authority can develop improved programs and strategies to prevent campus rape.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectWomen's Studies.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Administration.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Criminology and Penology.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Higher.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHigher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSlaughter, Shielaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9729534en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b34841271en_US
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