Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289231
Title:
Bile salt induced stress response pathways
Author:
Crowley, Cara Leilani
Issue Date:
2000
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Our lab has shown that the bile salt found in the highest concentration in human fecal water, sodium deoxycholate, induces apoptosis in several cell types including Jurkat cells as well as human colonic epithelial cells. We have also found that cells within the normal appearing flat mucosa of patients with a history of colon cancer are relatively resistant to apoptosis induced by NaDOC. The current studies test the hypothesis that sodium deoxycholate induces multiple stress response pathway s that protect against apoptosis. I have tested this hypothesis by developing and analyzing cell lines that are resistant to sodium deoxycholate-induced apoptosis and focusing on two stress-response proteins known to be activated by sodium deoxycholate, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and the redo-sensitive transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB). I found that PARP is protective against NaDOC-induced apoptosis, and by independently inhibiting the individual subunits of NF-κB, I found that the p65 subunit is protective, while the p50 subunit is not. Development and subsequent characterization of the NaDOC-resistant HCT-116 cell lines identified several proteins that may be responsible for the development of apoptosis resistance. These proteins will be further tested in future studies.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Microbiology.; Health Sciences, Oncology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Microbiology and Immunology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Payne, Claire M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleBile salt induced stress response pathwaysen_US
dc.creatorCrowley, Cara Leilanien_US
dc.contributor.authorCrowley, Cara Leilanien_US
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractOur lab has shown that the bile salt found in the highest concentration in human fecal water, sodium deoxycholate, induces apoptosis in several cell types including Jurkat cells as well as human colonic epithelial cells. We have also found that cells within the normal appearing flat mucosa of patients with a history of colon cancer are relatively resistant to apoptosis induced by NaDOC. The current studies test the hypothesis that sodium deoxycholate induces multiple stress response pathway s that protect against apoptosis. I have tested this hypothesis by developing and analyzing cell lines that are resistant to sodium deoxycholate-induced apoptosis and focusing on two stress-response proteins known to be activated by sodium deoxycholate, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and the redo-sensitive transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB). I found that PARP is protective against NaDOC-induced apoptosis, and by independently inhibiting the individual subunits of NF-κB, I found that the p65 subunit is protective, while the p50 subunit is not. Development and subsequent characterization of the NaDOC-resistant HCT-116 cell lines identified several proteins that may be responsible for the development of apoptosis resistance. These proteins will be further tested in future studies.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Microbiology.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Oncology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMicrobiology and Immunologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorPayne, Claire M.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9992142en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b41175323en_US
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