"Red Waters": Contesting marine space as Indian place in the United States Pacific Northwest

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289228
Title:
"Red Waters": Contesting marine space as Indian place in the United States Pacific Northwest
Author:
Barton, Karen Samantha
Issue Date:
2000
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study investigates the social construction of race, marine space, and resource conflict in one U.S. Native American community: the Makah Reservation, Neah Bay, Washington. A combination of archival records, news media coverage, and semistructured interviews is employed in order to expose the historic roots of the Makah Tribe's recent movement to reclaim control over traditional marine spaces. In particular, this research focuses on the gray whale controversy period between 1995-2000, when, to the consternation of conservation non-governmental organizations (NGOs), Makahs organized to resume a limited, cultural based harvest of the California gray whale in Pacific waters. This paper suggests that extant conflicts which developed between the Makah people, on one hand, and anti-whaling NGOs on another, were as much a struggle over marine space as they were a struggle over gray whale resources. Three central conclusions are drawn from the study. First, it is shown that Pacific marine "space" serves as a distinct, historical territory upon which many of the Makahs' political, cultural, and economic processes take form. Second, this research argues that NGO efforts to arrest the Makahs' contemporary whale harvest in offshore Pacific waters have been interpreted by tribal members as a neocolonialist invasion into what was once customarily managed marine space. Third, these results show how, despite the dominance of anti-whaling NGOs, Makahs have effectively mobilized global media technologies in order to empower themselves politically, transcend the territorial boundaries of the reservation, and reclaim control over the marine environment.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
American Studies.; Anthropology, Cultural.; Geography.; Sociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Geography and Regional Development
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Young, Emily H.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.title"Red Waters": Contesting marine space as Indian place in the United States Pacific Northwesten_US
dc.creatorBarton, Karen Samanthaen_US
dc.contributor.authorBarton, Karen Samanthaen_US
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study investigates the social construction of race, marine space, and resource conflict in one U.S. Native American community: the Makah Reservation, Neah Bay, Washington. A combination of archival records, news media coverage, and semistructured interviews is employed in order to expose the historic roots of the Makah Tribe's recent movement to reclaim control over traditional marine spaces. In particular, this research focuses on the gray whale controversy period between 1995-2000, when, to the consternation of conservation non-governmental organizations (NGOs), Makahs organized to resume a limited, cultural based harvest of the California gray whale in Pacific waters. This paper suggests that extant conflicts which developed between the Makah people, on one hand, and anti-whaling NGOs on another, were as much a struggle over marine space as they were a struggle over gray whale resources. Three central conclusions are drawn from the study. First, it is shown that Pacific marine "space" serves as a distinct, historical territory upon which many of the Makahs' political, cultural, and economic processes take form. Second, this research argues that NGO efforts to arrest the Makahs' contemporary whale harvest in offshore Pacific waters have been interpreted by tribal members as a neocolonialist invasion into what was once customarily managed marine space. Third, these results show how, despite the dominance of anti-whaling NGOs, Makahs have effectively mobilized global media technologies in order to empower themselves politically, transcend the territorial boundaries of the reservation, and reclaim control over the marine environment.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAmerican Studies.en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Cultural.en_US
dc.subjectGeography.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeography and Regional Developmenten_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorYoung, Emily H.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9992127en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b41174987en_US
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