Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289226
Title:
Effect of climate change in hydropower generation
Author:
Pacheco Gomez, Rodolfo Guillermo
Issue Date:
2000
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Impact of potential climatic change in hydropower generation has been the main objective of this research. Two flood control, hydropower, and recreation projects located in the midwest USA have been selected as the subject of the analysis given the consistency of the available climatic data and the adequate energy generation records. These two reservoirs are Stockton and Harry S. Truman Reservoirs located on the Osage River Basin which is part of the Lower Missouri River Basin. Both reservoirs were designed, constructed and are currently managed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Kansas City District. Long-term monthly precipitation, evaporation, temperature, streamflow and power generation records were used in the statistical analysis. The hydrologic data, precipitation, temperature, and streamflow data were utilized in a multivariate analysis with the purpose of producing a regression model capable of reproducing baseline conditions. From the baseline conditions, ten different climatic variation scenarios were studied. Each scenario produced a series of streamflow records that were extended using a randomly generated data to produce 21-year long reservoir inflow series. Reservoir inflow series in each scenario were modeled using a reservoir operation model. Firm energy was then evaluated and compared with baseline conditions to determine the economic impact of the climatic variations. In summary, operating rules and water reservoir management for different purposes are impacted and need further evaluation by operating managers, if streamflow records were to follow studied trends.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Engineering, Civil.; Environmental Sciences.; Energy.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Civil Engineering and Engineering Mechanics
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Contractor, Dinshaw N.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleEffect of climate change in hydropower generationen_US
dc.creatorPacheco Gomez, Rodolfo Guillermoen_US
dc.contributor.authorPacheco Gomez, Rodolfo Guillermoen_US
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractImpact of potential climatic change in hydropower generation has been the main objective of this research. Two flood control, hydropower, and recreation projects located in the midwest USA have been selected as the subject of the analysis given the consistency of the available climatic data and the adequate energy generation records. These two reservoirs are Stockton and Harry S. Truman Reservoirs located on the Osage River Basin which is part of the Lower Missouri River Basin. Both reservoirs were designed, constructed and are currently managed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Kansas City District. Long-term monthly precipitation, evaporation, temperature, streamflow and power generation records were used in the statistical analysis. The hydrologic data, precipitation, temperature, and streamflow data were utilized in a multivariate analysis with the purpose of producing a regression model capable of reproducing baseline conditions. From the baseline conditions, ten different climatic variation scenarios were studied. Each scenario produced a series of streamflow records that were extended using a randomly generated data to produce 21-year long reservoir inflow series. Reservoir inflow series in each scenario were modeled using a reservoir operation model. Firm energy was then evaluated and compared with baseline conditions to determine the economic impact of the climatic variations. In summary, operating rules and water reservoir management for different purposes are impacted and need further evaluation by operating managers, if streamflow records were to follow studied trends.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Civil.en_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental Sciences.en_US
dc.subjectEnergy.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCivil Engineering and Engineering Mechanicsen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorContractor, Dinshaw N.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9992120en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b41170714en_US
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