Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289213
Title:
Mexican American women's struggle to create health
Author:
Mendelson-Klauss, Cindy F.
Issue Date:
2000
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Mexican Americans constitute one of the fastest growing populations in the United States. Within Mexican American families, women are the primary caretakers and are responsible for managing family health. Many activities of health work fall within the household and domestic spheres. These activities include, providing a clean, safe environment providing nutritious foods, teaching hygienic practices, diagnosing and treating illnesses, and deciding when to seek outside health care. Until recently, household health work was not recognized as a factor in health knowledge and had been excluded from the discourse of health and healing. The purpose of this study was to describe health perceptions and health production among Mexican American women. This research was a descriptive ethnographic study of the health perceptions and health production of a sample of 13 English speaking Mexican American women. Informants participated in three in-depth interviews conducted over a two to four month period. The Household Production of Health was the conceptual model that guided this research and the World Health Organization definition of health was used to frame questions about health perceptions. Data analysis was directed towards identifying themes and sub-themes that were organized into categories that answered the three research questions. The informants integrated physical and mental health into an overarching concept of being healthy. Health included maintenance of the physical body, the mind, and the spirit. The informants identified a variety of health producing and help-seeking activities that were contextualized throughout their lives and were consistent with their health perceptions. In addition to outside employment, the informants took primary responsibility for health creation. Their roles were predominantly domestic in nature and included parenting, providing for health care, and managing and maintaining the household. This research has significance for nursing in three areas: (a) it explicates the importance of routine activities in health maintenance; (b) it provides a framework for community health nurses to analyze the entirety of health activities that occur within the household; and, (c) it suggests the importance of focusing health education on wellness behaviors such as stress reduction and coping strategies.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Anthropology, Cultural.; Women's Studies.; Health Sciences, Nursing.; Sociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Glittenberg, JoAnn E.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleMexican American women's struggle to create healthen_US
dc.creatorMendelson-Klauss, Cindy F.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMendelson-Klauss, Cindy F.en_US
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractMexican Americans constitute one of the fastest growing populations in the United States. Within Mexican American families, women are the primary caretakers and are responsible for managing family health. Many activities of health work fall within the household and domestic spheres. These activities include, providing a clean, safe environment providing nutritious foods, teaching hygienic practices, diagnosing and treating illnesses, and deciding when to seek outside health care. Until recently, household health work was not recognized as a factor in health knowledge and had been excluded from the discourse of health and healing. The purpose of this study was to describe health perceptions and health production among Mexican American women. This research was a descriptive ethnographic study of the health perceptions and health production of a sample of 13 English speaking Mexican American women. Informants participated in three in-depth interviews conducted over a two to four month period. The Household Production of Health was the conceptual model that guided this research and the World Health Organization definition of health was used to frame questions about health perceptions. Data analysis was directed towards identifying themes and sub-themes that were organized into categories that answered the three research questions. The informants integrated physical and mental health into an overarching concept of being healthy. Health included maintenance of the physical body, the mind, and the spirit. The informants identified a variety of health producing and help-seeking activities that were contextualized throughout their lives and were consistent with their health perceptions. In addition to outside employment, the informants took primary responsibility for health creation. Their roles were predominantly domestic in nature and included parenting, providing for health care, and managing and maintaining the household. This research has significance for nursing in three areas: (a) it explicates the importance of routine activities in health maintenance; (b) it provides a framework for community health nurses to analyze the entirety of health activities that occur within the household; and, (c) it suggests the importance of focusing health education on wellness behaviors such as stress reduction and coping strategies.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Cultural.en_US
dc.subjectWomen's Studies.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Nursing.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGlittenberg, JoAnn E.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9992091en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b41169591en_US
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