In pursuit of the longue duree: Usinga geographic information system to model archaeological settlement patternsin the region of Tell el-'Umeiri, Jordan

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289208
Title:
In pursuit of the longue duree: Usinga geographic information system to model archaeological settlement patternsin the region of Tell el-'Umeiri, Jordan
Author:
Christopherson, Gary L.
Issue Date:
2000
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The Madaba Plains Project has long been interested in the cyclic pattern of settlement intensification and abatement in Jordan. A relationship between these cycles and the environment was assumed, but making tangible connections between them has proven difficult. This study uses Fernand Braudel's temporal hierarchy, particularly his longue duree, as a theoretical framework for approaching the relationship between ancient humans and their environment; and utilizes geographic information systems (GIS) technology to establish the relationship. Archaeological data, supplied by the regional survey in the hinterland of Tell al-'Umeiri, Jordan, is placed in the context of environmental data managed by the GIS. Three analyses are carried out. Logistic regression models were constructed to discover environmental signatures for sites from different periods. Erosion models are used to discover whether or not terrace agriculture was utilized during these same periods. Finally, visibility analysis is used to document socio/cultural factors in settlement location strategies.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Anthropology, Archaeology.; Geography.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Near Eastern Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Dever, William G.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleIn pursuit of the longue duree: Usinga geographic information system to model archaeological settlement patternsin the region of Tell el-'Umeiri, Jordanen_US
dc.creatorChristopherson, Gary L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorChristopherson, Gary L.en_US
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Madaba Plains Project has long been interested in the cyclic pattern of settlement intensification and abatement in Jordan. A relationship between these cycles and the environment was assumed, but making tangible connections between them has proven difficult. This study uses Fernand Braudel's temporal hierarchy, particularly his longue duree, as a theoretical framework for approaching the relationship between ancient humans and their environment; and utilizes geographic information systems (GIS) technology to establish the relationship. Archaeological data, supplied by the regional survey in the hinterland of Tell al-'Umeiri, Jordan, is placed in the context of environmental data managed by the GIS. Three analyses are carried out. Logistic regression models were constructed to discover environmental signatures for sites from different periods. Erosion models are used to discover whether or not terrace agriculture was utilized during these same periods. Finally, visibility analysis is used to document socio/cultural factors in settlement location strategies.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Archaeology.en_US
dc.subjectGeography.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNear Eastern Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDever, William G.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9992082en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b41167235en_US
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