A longitudinal analysis of return migration from Australia,1982-1990

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289207
Title:
A longitudinal analysis of return migration from Australia,1982-1990
Author:
Glavac, Sonya Maree
Issue Date:
2000
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study evaluates three hypotheses of return migration from Australia: the success hypothesis, the failure hypothesis and the continued evaluation hypothesis. Under the success hypothesis, migrants integrate well into Australian society, but return when they reach their target income. The failure hypothesis proposes that migrants have strong ties to their country of origin and do not integrate well into Australian society. This weak level of integration leads to low probabilities of finding employment and low wage. That, combined with the high pecuniary costs associated with remaining in Australia leads to high probabilities of return migration when economic conditions in Australia are poor. Under this scenario, migrants tend to be older, married and are poorly skilled. In the final hypothesis--the continued evaluation hypothesis--migrants retain strong ties to their country of origin while also integrating into Australian society. However, unlike the previous two hypotheses, migrants continue to compare economic conditions in their country of origin with those in Australia, and return when benefits outweigh the costs of remaining in Australia. The three hypotheses are tested using data from Australian arrival and departure cards and a Cox proportional hazard model. The continued evaluation path hypothesis is found to be most appropriate for Hong Kong, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and the United States, whereas the success hypothesis is most applicable for South Africa, Viet Nam and Yugoslavia. There was little support for the failure hypothesis.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Geography.; Sociology, Demography.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Geography and Regional Development
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Waldorf, Brigitte S.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleA longitudinal analysis of return migration from Australia,1982-1990en_US
dc.creatorGlavac, Sonya Mareeen_US
dc.contributor.authorGlavac, Sonya Mareeen_US
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study evaluates three hypotheses of return migration from Australia: the success hypothesis, the failure hypothesis and the continued evaluation hypothesis. Under the success hypothesis, migrants integrate well into Australian society, but return when they reach their target income. The failure hypothesis proposes that migrants have strong ties to their country of origin and do not integrate well into Australian society. This weak level of integration leads to low probabilities of finding employment and low wage. That, combined with the high pecuniary costs associated with remaining in Australia leads to high probabilities of return migration when economic conditions in Australia are poor. Under this scenario, migrants tend to be older, married and are poorly skilled. In the final hypothesis--the continued evaluation hypothesis--migrants retain strong ties to their country of origin while also integrating into Australian society. However, unlike the previous two hypotheses, migrants continue to compare economic conditions in their country of origin with those in Australia, and return when benefits outweigh the costs of remaining in Australia. The three hypotheses are tested using data from Australian arrival and departure cards and a Cox proportional hazard model. The continued evaluation path hypothesis is found to be most appropriate for Hong Kong, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and the United States, whereas the success hypothesis is most applicable for South Africa, Viet Nam and Yugoslavia. There was little support for the failure hypothesis.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectGeography.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Demography.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeography and Regional Developmenten_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWaldorf, Brigitte S.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9992080en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b41167132en_US
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