Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289203
Title:
Portable snapshot infrared imaging spectrometer
Author:
Volin, Curtis Earl
Issue Date:
2000
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A practical, field-capable, 3.0 to 5.0 μm mid-wave infrared Computed-Tomography Imaging Spectrometer (CTIS) has been demonstrated. The CTIS employs a simple optical system in order to measure the object cube without any scanning . The data is not measured directly, but in a manner which requires complicated post-processing to extract an estimate of the object's spectral radiance. The advantage of a snapshot imaging spectrometer is that it can collect information about a dynamic event which a standard scanning spectrometer could either miss or corrupt with temporal artifacts. Results were presented for reconstructions of laboratory targets with sampling up to 46 x 46 x 21 voxels over a variable field-of-view, or 0.1 μm spectral sampling. Demonstration of the snapshot capability has been performed on both static targets and targets with rapidly varying content. The contents of this dissertation are directed towards two ends. The primary undertaking is a realization of the theoretical model of the CTIS is a practical, field-capable MWIR instrument. The design, calibration, and operation of the MWIR CTIS are explained in detail in the text and appendices. Of additional interest is the advancement of the theory to improve the design and functionality of the spectrometer. A new algorithm for design of the holographic disperser component of the CTIS is introduced. The design process dramatically extends the set of possibilities for the disperser. In order to improve the reconstruction potential of the spectrometer, the analytic expressions which describe the CTIS have been expanded into a principal component basis set. The result is a technique for creating an initial estimate of the object and a technique for improving the reconstruction algorithm.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Health Sciences, Radiology.; Physics, Optics.; Biophysics, Medical.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Optical Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Dereniak, Eustace L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titlePortable snapshot infrared imaging spectrometeren_US
dc.creatorVolin, Curtis Earlen_US
dc.contributor.authorVolin, Curtis Earlen_US
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA practical, field-capable, 3.0 to 5.0 μm mid-wave infrared Computed-Tomography Imaging Spectrometer (CTIS) has been demonstrated. The CTIS employs a simple optical system in order to measure the object cube without any scanning . The data is not measured directly, but in a manner which requires complicated post-processing to extract an estimate of the object's spectral radiance. The advantage of a snapshot imaging spectrometer is that it can collect information about a dynamic event which a standard scanning spectrometer could either miss or corrupt with temporal artifacts. Results were presented for reconstructions of laboratory targets with sampling up to 46 x 46 x 21 voxels over a variable field-of-view, or 0.1 μm spectral sampling. Demonstration of the snapshot capability has been performed on both static targets and targets with rapidly varying content. The contents of this dissertation are directed towards two ends. The primary undertaking is a realization of the theoretical model of the CTIS is a practical, field-capable MWIR instrument. The design, calibration, and operation of the MWIR CTIS are explained in detail in the text and appendices. Of additional interest is the advancement of the theory to improve the design and functionality of the spectrometer. A new algorithm for design of the holographic disperser component of the CTIS is introduced. The design process dramatically extends the set of possibilities for the disperser. In order to improve the reconstruction potential of the spectrometer, the analytic expressions which describe the CTIS have been expanded into a principal component basis set. The result is a technique for creating an initial estimate of the object and a technique for improving the reconstruction algorithm.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Radiology.en_US
dc.subjectPhysics, Optics.en_US
dc.subjectBiophysics, Medical.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineOptical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDereniak, Eustace L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9992067en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b41166280en_US
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