Reliability quantification of plates subjected to random vibration and temperature loads

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289202
Title:
Reliability quantification of plates subjected to random vibration and temperature loads
Author:
Zhang, Yongcang
Issue Date:
2000
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Random vibration coupled with thermal cycling is a common environment for a lot of mechanical and electrical products, especially for those experiencing transportation and handling frequently. Today, random vibration plus thermal cycling have been broadly applied as an important stimulus stress to expose the latent defects during development. In addition, drop tests are also necessary for these products since an accidental drop may seriously damage them. Both random vibration and drop tests are expensive. Plate element is popular in portable and transportation related products, for example, the Printed Circuit Boards (PCBs) in equipment installed in vehicles, the Liquid Crystal Displays (LCDs) in portable computers and the skin panels near the engines in airplanes. These plate elements are subjected to random vibration and thermal cycling, and some of them may encounter a drop. Even through the deterministic vibration theory of plates has been developed a lot, the random vibration theory of plates has not been well explored yet, particularly in reliability quantification, response analysis, and thermal load effect. In this dissertation, a random vibration analysis model for packaged plates is proposed for base excited random vibration coupled with temperature loads. Based on this model, a reliability quantification model is proposed, too. Two common random vibration power spectral densities "Ideal White Noise (IWN)" and "Band Limited White Noise (BLWN)" are researched. As a result, the closed form solution for IWN is derived and the numerical procedure for BLWN is presented. By comparing the IWN results with the BLWN results, an application limit to IWN is discovered. The effects of temperature and damping on reliability are then investigated. For the drop load case, the response process and the reliability are researched, and the illustrative example is given to demonstrate the methodology. The research results of the dissertation may supply designers with guidelines and supplement testing with analytical data; therefore, the test cost can hopefully be cut down. The methodologies can be applied to the evaluation of transportation reliability.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Engineering, Mechanical.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Kececioglu, Dimitri B.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleReliability quantification of plates subjected to random vibration and temperature loadsen_US
dc.creatorZhang, Yongcangen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Yongcangen_US
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractRandom vibration coupled with thermal cycling is a common environment for a lot of mechanical and electrical products, especially for those experiencing transportation and handling frequently. Today, random vibration plus thermal cycling have been broadly applied as an important stimulus stress to expose the latent defects during development. In addition, drop tests are also necessary for these products since an accidental drop may seriously damage them. Both random vibration and drop tests are expensive. Plate element is popular in portable and transportation related products, for example, the Printed Circuit Boards (PCBs) in equipment installed in vehicles, the Liquid Crystal Displays (LCDs) in portable computers and the skin panels near the engines in airplanes. These plate elements are subjected to random vibration and thermal cycling, and some of them may encounter a drop. Even through the deterministic vibration theory of plates has been developed a lot, the random vibration theory of plates has not been well explored yet, particularly in reliability quantification, response analysis, and thermal load effect. In this dissertation, a random vibration analysis model for packaged plates is proposed for base excited random vibration coupled with temperature loads. Based on this model, a reliability quantification model is proposed, too. Two common random vibration power spectral densities "Ideal White Noise (IWN)" and "Band Limited White Noise (BLWN)" are researched. As a result, the closed form solution for IWN is derived and the numerical procedure for BLWN is presented. By comparing the IWN results with the BLWN results, an application limit to IWN is discovered. The effects of temperature and damping on reliability are then investigated. For the drop load case, the response process and the reliability are researched, and the illustrative example is given to demonstrate the methodology. The research results of the dissertation may supply designers with guidelines and supplement testing with analytical data; therefore, the test cost can hopefully be cut down. The methodologies can be applied to the evaluation of transportation reliability.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Mechanical.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAerospace and Mechanical Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKececioglu, Dimitri B.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9992064en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b41166243en_US
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