Exploring expanded wavelength regions with solid state focal plane detectors

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289195
Title:
Exploring expanded wavelength regions with solid state focal plane detectors
Author:
Ridder, Trent D.
Issue Date:
2000
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation research has focused on the design of two spectroscopic instruments that operate outside of the UV/visible region for the analysis of volatile organic hydrocarbons and hard-to-separate hydrocarbon mixtures. The first design was solid state near infrared spectrometer. The fast acquisition rate of the NIR spectrometer allowed the monitoring of the bromination of 1-hexene. The concentrations of 1-hexene and 1,2-dibromohexane were determined for the reaction using classical least squares. The root mean squared errors of prediction for 1-hexene and 1,2-dibromohexane concentrations were 0.01 and 0.003 M, respectively. This research project also focused on the investigation of the effects of instrumental parameters on partial least squares models by comparing the results obtained from four different spectrometers. The results indicate that instrumental parameters, such as resolution and wavelength coverage, have a larger effect on experimental results than the analysis method (NIR or Raman). The second instrument design investigated here was a vacuum ultraviolet ICP-AES which monitored the 130 to 200 nm wavelength range. Fifteen nonmetals were used to determine the quantitative characteristics of the design. All elements demonstrated detection limits in the ppb range. The most sensitive emission line in this work was the aluminum 167.079 nm line which had a detection limit of 200 ppt. A VUV atomic emission line database was developed to provide an analytical reference for future investigations. The database included the emission lines from 76 elements over the 130 to 195 nm wavelength region. Over 2200 lines were observed and reported. Over 1000 of the lines were previously unreported in the two major existing references for the VUV. This work is the first VUV reference to provide truly comparable intensities for a large number of elements. A GC-VUV-ICP-AES was developed to investigate the potential of VUV-ICP atomic emission spectroscopy to provide both quantitative and qualitative information for mixtures. Chlorine and carbon chromatograms were obtained simultaneously for volatile organic hydrocarbon (VOC) mixtures. The work showed that GC-VUV-ICP-AES has the potential of generating empirical formulas for compounds by simultaneously quantitating each element in the compound and determining their ratios.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Chemistry, Analytical.; Physics, Optics.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Chemistry
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Denton, M. Bonner

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleExploring expanded wavelength regions with solid state focal plane detectorsen_US
dc.creatorRidder, Trent D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRidder, Trent D.en_US
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation research has focused on the design of two spectroscopic instruments that operate outside of the UV/visible region for the analysis of volatile organic hydrocarbons and hard-to-separate hydrocarbon mixtures. The first design was solid state near infrared spectrometer. The fast acquisition rate of the NIR spectrometer allowed the monitoring of the bromination of 1-hexene. The concentrations of 1-hexene and 1,2-dibromohexane were determined for the reaction using classical least squares. The root mean squared errors of prediction for 1-hexene and 1,2-dibromohexane concentrations were 0.01 and 0.003 M, respectively. This research project also focused on the investigation of the effects of instrumental parameters on partial least squares models by comparing the results obtained from four different spectrometers. The results indicate that instrumental parameters, such as resolution and wavelength coverage, have a larger effect on experimental results than the analysis method (NIR or Raman). The second instrument design investigated here was a vacuum ultraviolet ICP-AES which monitored the 130 to 200 nm wavelength range. Fifteen nonmetals were used to determine the quantitative characteristics of the design. All elements demonstrated detection limits in the ppb range. The most sensitive emission line in this work was the aluminum 167.079 nm line which had a detection limit of 200 ppt. A VUV atomic emission line database was developed to provide an analytical reference for future investigations. The database included the emission lines from 76 elements over the 130 to 195 nm wavelength region. Over 2200 lines were observed and reported. Over 1000 of the lines were previously unreported in the two major existing references for the VUV. This work is the first VUV reference to provide truly comparable intensities for a large number of elements. A GC-VUV-ICP-AES was developed to investigate the potential of VUV-ICP atomic emission spectroscopy to provide both quantitative and qualitative information for mixtures. Chlorine and carbon chromatograms were obtained simultaneously for volatile organic hydrocarbon (VOC) mixtures. The work showed that GC-VUV-ICP-AES has the potential of generating empirical formulas for compounds by simultaneously quantitating each element in the compound and determining their ratios.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectChemistry, Analytical.en_US
dc.subjectPhysics, Optics.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineChemistryen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDenton, M. Bonneren_US
dc.identifier.proquest9992052en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b41166036en_US
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