The relationship between the spiritual dimension of the nurse-patient relationship and patient well-being

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289187
Title:
The relationship between the spiritual dimension of the nurse-patient relationship and patient well-being
Author:
Rieck, Sue Boswell
Issue Date:
2000
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to examine if the spiritual dimension of the nurse-patient relationship (SDNPR) contributes to patient well-being. The research design was a nonexperimental, predictive, latent-variable model and two open-ended questions that asked participants to describe nurse characteristics and behaviors important to well-being. The model included age, significant life events, health, social support, and self-transcendence in addition to SDNPR as predictors of well-being. The sample consisted of hospitalized, postoperative adult patients (N = 98). The Spiritual Dimension Inventory (SDI), a 25 item, four dimensional scale was developed to measure SDNPR. Reliability coefficients for the SDI subscales (connection, empathy, commitment, and trust) and for the total scale were .84 and above. Construct validity was established through measurement model testing. Predictive validity was supported by regression analysis. Connection, commitment, and trust explained 53% of the variance of well-being. The predictive model was tested by confirmatory factor analysis and compared to five competing models. The results of the model testing did not support the hypothesized model of SDNPR predicting well-being. Four themes of nurse characteristics emerged from the content analysis of the responses to the open-ended questions: concern for the patient in time of need, being recognized as a person and feeling accepted, competence, and teaching and explaining.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Health Sciences, Nursing.; Psychology, Clinical.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Reed, Pamela G.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe relationship between the spiritual dimension of the nurse-patient relationship and patient well-beingen_US
dc.creatorRieck, Sue Boswellen_US
dc.contributor.authorRieck, Sue Boswellen_US
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to examine if the spiritual dimension of the nurse-patient relationship (SDNPR) contributes to patient well-being. The research design was a nonexperimental, predictive, latent-variable model and two open-ended questions that asked participants to describe nurse characteristics and behaviors important to well-being. The model included age, significant life events, health, social support, and self-transcendence in addition to SDNPR as predictors of well-being. The sample consisted of hospitalized, postoperative adult patients (N = 98). The Spiritual Dimension Inventory (SDI), a 25 item, four dimensional scale was developed to measure SDNPR. Reliability coefficients for the SDI subscales (connection, empathy, commitment, and trust) and for the total scale were .84 and above. Construct validity was established through measurement model testing. Predictive validity was supported by regression analysis. Connection, commitment, and trust explained 53% of the variance of well-being. The predictive model was tested by confirmatory factor analysis and compared to five competing models. The results of the model testing did not support the hypothesized model of SDNPR predicting well-being. Four themes of nurse characteristics emerged from the content analysis of the responses to the open-ended questions: concern for the patient in time of need, being recognized as a person and feeling accepted, competence, and teaching and explaining.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Nursing.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Clinical.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorReed, Pamela G.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9983908en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b40834244en_US
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