The relationship between positive affect and negative affect: A behavioral genetic analysis

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289180
Title:
The relationship between positive affect and negative affect: A behavioral genetic analysis
Author:
Neiss, Michelle Roseanne
Issue Date:
2000
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
For years, researchers have debated the structure of affect. Although many researchers claim positive and negative affect are independent, others present evidence that the two are bipolar. The current study used a behavioral genetic design as a unique way to address this debate. A national sample of 783 sibling pairs, including 117 identical twins, 160 fraternal twins, and 506 full-sibling non-twin pairs provided information on their positive and negative affect over the past month. A sub-sample of 210 twin pairs provided additional information on their positive and negative affect over daily and weekly time frames. Several different analyses indicated that at the phenotypic level, affect demonstrated a bipolar structure. Multivariate behavioral genetic analyses were used to estimate common genetic and environmental factors that influence the relationship between positive and negative affect, as well as the specific genetic and environmental factors that influence each. These analyses indicated that specific genetic and shared environmental factors were not necessary to explain the relationship between positive and negative affect. This pattern of results was consistent with the bipolar viewpoint. The structure of affect looked to be bipolar across differing time frames. No age differences in the structure of affect were found.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Developmental.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Family and Consumer Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Rowe, David C.; Almeida, David M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe relationship between positive affect and negative affect: A behavioral genetic analysisen_US
dc.creatorNeiss, Michelle Roseanneen_US
dc.contributor.authorNeiss, Michelle Roseanneen_US
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractFor years, researchers have debated the structure of affect. Although many researchers claim positive and negative affect are independent, others present evidence that the two are bipolar. The current study used a behavioral genetic design as a unique way to address this debate. A national sample of 783 sibling pairs, including 117 identical twins, 160 fraternal twins, and 506 full-sibling non-twin pairs provided information on their positive and negative affect over the past month. A sub-sample of 210 twin pairs provided additional information on their positive and negative affect over daily and weekly time frames. Several different analyses indicated that at the phenotypic level, affect demonstrated a bipolar structure. Multivariate behavioral genetic analyses were used to estimate common genetic and environmental factors that influence the relationship between positive and negative affect, as well as the specific genetic and environmental factors that influence each. These analyses indicated that specific genetic and shared environmental factors were not necessary to explain the relationship between positive and negative affect. This pattern of results was consistent with the bipolar viewpoint. The structure of affect looked to be bipolar across differing time frames. No age differences in the structure of affect were found.en_US
dc.description.noteDigitization note: p. 43 & 72 missing from paper original.-
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Developmental.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineFamily and Consumer Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRowe, David C.en_US
dc.contributor.advisorAlmeida, David M.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9983894en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b40825541en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.