The character of guilt within interpersonal relationships: A comparison of friends and significant others

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289176
Title:
The character of guilt within interpersonal relationships: A comparison of friends and significant others
Author:
Allspach, Lisa E.
Issue Date:
2000
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Recently, the role of guilt within interpersonal relationships has come under scrutiny. This research, though informative, has been primarily gleaned from retrospective accounts. This investigation examines guilt virtually as it is elicited in friendship and significant-other dyads, probing the following issues: (a) experienced guilt and perceptions of conversational appropriateness as they relate to relational satisfaction and relational interdependence, (b) the association between elicitors' and targets' perceptions of relational transgression and relational satisfaction, (c) elicitors' perceptions of predicted and actual outcomes of guilt elicitation, (d) effects of guilt elicitation on targets' perceptions of the relationship, (e) self-esteem's effect on targets' experienced guilt, and (f) effects of relationship type (i.e., friends vs. significant others) on the above. Results indicate that relationship type is associated with intensity of the guilt appeal, and is a factor in the link between relational interdependence and perceptions of a guilt appeal's appropriateness. Additionally relationship type, relational interdependence, and relational satisfaction offered some demonstration of moderating the usage and reception of guilt. Relational satisfaction evidenced no association with partners' perceptions of the relational transgression, while self-esteem demonstrated a near significant association with experienced guilt. Content analyses of elicitors' perceptions of predicted and actual outcomes and targets' perceptions of relational meanings of guilt appeals are presented.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Social.; Speech Communication.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Communication
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Burgoon, Judee K.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe character of guilt within interpersonal relationships: A comparison of friends and significant othersen_US
dc.creatorAllspach, Lisa E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAllspach, Lisa E.en_US
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractRecently, the role of guilt within interpersonal relationships has come under scrutiny. This research, though informative, has been primarily gleaned from retrospective accounts. This investigation examines guilt virtually as it is elicited in friendship and significant-other dyads, probing the following issues: (a) experienced guilt and perceptions of conversational appropriateness as they relate to relational satisfaction and relational interdependence, (b) the association between elicitors' and targets' perceptions of relational transgression and relational satisfaction, (c) elicitors' perceptions of predicted and actual outcomes of guilt elicitation, (d) effects of guilt elicitation on targets' perceptions of the relationship, (e) self-esteem's effect on targets' experienced guilt, and (f) effects of relationship type (i.e., friends vs. significant others) on the above. Results indicate that relationship type is associated with intensity of the guilt appeal, and is a factor in the link between relational interdependence and perceptions of a guilt appeal's appropriateness. Additionally relationship type, relational interdependence, and relational satisfaction offered some demonstration of moderating the usage and reception of guilt. Relational satisfaction evidenced no association with partners' perceptions of the relational transgression, while self-esteem demonstrated a near significant association with experienced guilt. Content analyses of elicitors' perceptions of predicted and actual outcomes and targets' perceptions of relational meanings of guilt appeals are presented.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Social.en_US
dc.subjectSpeech Communication.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunicationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBurgoon, Judee K.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9983888en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b40825279en_US
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