Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289160
Title:
Optical design using novel aspheric surfaces
Author:
Lerner, Scott Allen
Issue Date:
2000
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Advancements in the design, manufacturing and testing of optical systems have created the need for new functional representations for aspheric surfaces. The representations must define surfaces that can compensate for a high degree of wavefront asphericity and represent steeply sloped surfaces as the surface normal becomes perpendicular to the optical axis. As the standard asphere is explicitly defined, the range of surfaces that it can properly describe is limited. This work develops both a parametrically defined surface approach and an implicitly defined surface approach. Whereas the surface sag of an explicit surface is defined directly using one equation, the sag of a parametric surface is defined using at least two equations. The sag of an implicit surface is defined indirectly using a surface function. The utility of these novel approaches is demonstrated using examples of current interest. Specifically, a truncated parametric Taylor surface and an implicit xyz-polynomial surface are shown to be more general definitions that represent highly aspheric surfaces better the standard explicit asphere. Ray tracing and optimization strategies for parametric and implicit surface representations are discussed. Additionally, this work shows that a Fourier series is not a useful optical surface and introduces the explicit superconic surface, which is a redefinition of the standard superconic surface. Finally, we compare the surface types discussed for ray tracing speed, optimization complexity, and ability to represent highly aspheric surfaces.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Physics, Optics.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Optical Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Sasian, Jose M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleOptical design using novel aspheric surfacesen_US
dc.creatorLerner, Scott Allenen_US
dc.contributor.authorLerner, Scott Allenen_US
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAdvancements in the design, manufacturing and testing of optical systems have created the need for new functional representations for aspheric surfaces. The representations must define surfaces that can compensate for a high degree of wavefront asphericity and represent steeply sloped surfaces as the surface normal becomes perpendicular to the optical axis. As the standard asphere is explicitly defined, the range of surfaces that it can properly describe is limited. This work develops both a parametrically defined surface approach and an implicitly defined surface approach. Whereas the surface sag of an explicit surface is defined directly using one equation, the sag of a parametric surface is defined using at least two equations. The sag of an implicit surface is defined indirectly using a surface function. The utility of these novel approaches is demonstrated using examples of current interest. Specifically, a truncated parametric Taylor surface and an implicit xyz-polynomial surface are shown to be more general definitions that represent highly aspheric surfaces better the standard explicit asphere. Ray tracing and optimization strategies for parametric and implicit surface representations are discussed. Additionally, this work shows that a Fourier series is not a useful optical surface and introduces the explicit superconic surface, which is a redefinition of the standard superconic surface. Finally, we compare the surface types discussed for ray tracing speed, optimization complexity, and ability to represent highly aspheric surfaces.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPhysics, Optics.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineOptical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSasian, Jose M.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9983853en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b40821870en_US
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