Staying or leaving: A multilevel approach to explaining variation in persistence rates among Christian college undergraduates

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289151
Title:
Staying or leaving: A multilevel approach to explaining variation in persistence rates among Christian college undergraduates
Author:
Walter, Karna Lea
Issue Date:
2000
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study of student persistence among institutions of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities represents an attempt to understand factors, particularly student satisfaction, that influence student persistence. Both student-level characteristics and institution-level characteristics have bearing on persistence rates, so a multilevel model is employed that takes both sets of characteristics into account. A thorough review of pertinent literature is included, as well as a depiction of Hierarchical Linear Modeling, the statistical method used. Several student-level characteristics that had a positive impact on persistence are presented, including class level, graduate or professional school aspirations, living on campus, satisfaction with academic life, satisfaction with religious life, and satisfaction with social life. Two student-level characteristics that had a negative influence on persistence, working off campus and attending an institution that was not one's first or second choice, are reviewed. Two institution-level variables that positively impacted persistence, including tuition and total enrollment, are presented, and one characteristic that negatively influenced persistence, percentage of women students, is discussed. The implications of these findings are advanced, and recommendations for practice and research are presented.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Educational Psychology.; Education, Higher.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Center for the Higher Education
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Woodard, Dudley B., Jr.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleStaying or leaving: A multilevel approach to explaining variation in persistence rates among Christian college undergraduatesen_US
dc.creatorWalter, Karna Leaen_US
dc.contributor.authorWalter, Karna Leaen_US
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study of student persistence among institutions of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities represents an attempt to understand factors, particularly student satisfaction, that influence student persistence. Both student-level characteristics and institution-level characteristics have bearing on persistence rates, so a multilevel model is employed that takes both sets of characteristics into account. A thorough review of pertinent literature is included, as well as a depiction of Hierarchical Linear Modeling, the statistical method used. Several student-level characteristics that had a positive impact on persistence are presented, including class level, graduate or professional school aspirations, living on campus, satisfaction with academic life, satisfaction with religious life, and satisfaction with social life. Two student-level characteristics that had a negative influence on persistence, working off campus and attending an institution that was not one's first or second choice, are reviewed. Two institution-level variables that positively impacted persistence, including tuition and total enrollment, are presented, and one characteristic that negatively influenced persistence, percentage of women students, is discussed. The implications of these findings are advanced, and recommendations for practice and research are presented.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Educational Psychology.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Higher.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCenter for the Higher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWoodard, Dudley B., Jr.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9972120en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b4064067xen_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.