The effects of organizational factors on citizen participation in community crime prevention programs in Japan

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289147
Title:
The effects of organizational factors on citizen participation in community crime prevention programs in Japan
Author:
Kobayashi, Juichi, 1960-
Issue Date:
2000
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Structural equation modeling and hierarchical linear modeling were used to examine the effects of citizen participation in crime prevention programs and fear of crime among residents in Japan. The democratic and efficient management of the programs by citizen leaders, and their adequate support by the police, were found to increase the commitment of residents to crime prevention activities. Further, a sense of personal control over the neighborhood was found to mediate much more of the amount of the impact of these organizational factors on the commitment of residents to crime prevention activities than was the perceived social cohesion of the neighborhood. By contrast, perceived social cohesion was found to significantly decrease the fear of crime among residents, although it did not mediate a substantial amount of the alleviating effects of support by police on the fear of crime. The cross-cultural and policy implications are discussed.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Social.; Sociology, Criminology and Penology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Sales, Bruce D.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe effects of organizational factors on citizen participation in community crime prevention programs in Japanen_US
dc.creatorKobayashi, Juichi, 1960-en_US
dc.contributor.authorKobayashi, Juichi, 1960-en_US
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractStructural equation modeling and hierarchical linear modeling were used to examine the effects of citizen participation in crime prevention programs and fear of crime among residents in Japan. The democratic and efficient management of the programs by citizen leaders, and their adequate support by the police, were found to increase the commitment of residents to crime prevention activities. Further, a sense of personal control over the neighborhood was found to mediate much more of the amount of the impact of these organizational factors on the commitment of residents to crime prevention activities than was the perceived social cohesion of the neighborhood. By contrast, perceived social cohesion was found to significantly decrease the fear of crime among residents, although it did not mediate a substantial amount of the alleviating effects of support by police on the fear of crime. The cross-cultural and policy implications are discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Social.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Criminology and Penology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSales, Bruce D.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9972111en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b40640425en_US
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