Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/289137
Title:
The institutionalization of the United States Senate, 1789-1996
Author:
White, David Richard
Issue Date:
2000
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The research presented here fills a gap in the congressional literature by documenting the historical institutionalization of the U.S. Senate. After an extensive review of the institutionalization literature in Chapter Two, Chapters Three through Six qualitatively document the Senate's institutionalization over four chronological time periods: 1789-1860; 1861-1900; 1901-1946; 1947-1996. Using both primary and secondary sources, these chapters provide a comprehensive historical analysis of Senate development, covering key aspects such as committees, leaders, personnel and operations. Chapters Seven and Eight chart the Senate's institutionalization in a more systematic manner. Chapter Seven presents multiple indicators for each of four components of institutionalization: adaptability; autonomy; complexity; and coherence. Chapter Eight then models the process of Senate institutionalization. Using ordinary least squares and weighted least squares regression, it tests the model for each component of institutionalization. Political party opposition in the presidency, federal government activity, the Seventeenth Amendment and continuous majority control of the Senate by one political party all prove significant in one or more components of Senate institutionalization. Chapter Nine summarizes the Senate institutionalization process, and suggests how the Senate's post-World War II "transformation" fits into this larger, historical process.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
History, United States.; Political Science, General.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Political Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ragsdale, Lyn K.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe institutionalization of the United States Senate, 1789-1996en_US
dc.creatorWhite, David Richarden_US
dc.contributor.authorWhite, David Richarden_US
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe research presented here fills a gap in the congressional literature by documenting the historical institutionalization of the U.S. Senate. After an extensive review of the institutionalization literature in Chapter Two, Chapters Three through Six qualitatively document the Senate's institutionalization over four chronological time periods: 1789-1860; 1861-1900; 1901-1946; 1947-1996. Using both primary and secondary sources, these chapters provide a comprehensive historical analysis of Senate development, covering key aspects such as committees, leaders, personnel and operations. Chapters Seven and Eight chart the Senate's institutionalization in a more systematic manner. Chapter Seven presents multiple indicators for each of four components of institutionalization: adaptability; autonomy; complexity; and coherence. Chapter Eight then models the process of Senate institutionalization. Using ordinary least squares and weighted least squares regression, it tests the model for each component of institutionalization. Political party opposition in the presidency, federal government activity, the Seventeenth Amendment and continuous majority control of the Senate by one political party all prove significant in one or more components of Senate institutionalization. Chapter Nine summarizes the Senate institutionalization process, and suggests how the Senate's post-World War II "transformation" fits into this larger, historical process.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHistory, United States.en_US
dc.subjectPolitical Science, General.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRagsdale, Lyn K.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9972084en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b4063839xen_US
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